Atomic Habits: outlet online sale An Easy & Proven Way to Build online sale Good Habits & Break Bad Ones online

Atomic Habits: outlet online sale An Easy & Proven Way to Build online sale Good Habits & Break Bad Ones online

Atomic Habits: outlet online sale An Easy & Proven Way to Build online sale Good Habits & Break Bad Ones online
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The #1 New York Times bestseller. Over 3 million copies sold!

Tiny Changes, Remarkable Results


No matter your goals, Atomic Habits offers a proven framework for improving--every day. James Clear, one of the world''s leading experts on habit formation, reveals practical strategies that will teach you exactly how to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that lead to remarkable results.

If you''re having trouble changing your habits, the problem isn''t you. The problem is your system. Bad habits repeat themselves again and again not because you don''t want to change, but because you have the wrong system for change. You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems. Here, you''ll get a proven system that can take you to new heights.

Clear is known for his ability to distill complex topics into simple behaviors that can be easily applied to daily life and work. Here, he draws on the most proven ideas from biology, psychology, and neuroscience to create an easy-to-understand guide for making good habits inevitable and bad habits impossible. Along the way, readers will be inspired and entertained with true stories from Olympic gold medalists, award-winning artists, business leaders, life-saving physicians, and star comedians who have used the science of small habits to master their craft and vault to the top of their field.

Learn how to:
   make time for new habits (even when life gets crazy);
   overcome a lack of motivation and willpower;
   design your environment to make success easier;
   get back on track when you fall off course;
...and much more.

Atomic Habits will reshape the way you think about progress and success, and give you the tools and strategies you need to transform your habits--whether you are a team looking to win a championship, an organization hoping to redefine an industry, or simply an individual who wishes to quit smoking, lose weight, reduce stress, or achieve any other goal.

Review

Wall Street Journal bestseller
USA Today bestseller
Publisher''s Weekly bestseller
One of Fast Company''s 7 Best Business Books of 2018
One of Business Insider''s Best Self-Help Books of 2018


"A supremely practical and useful book. James Clear distills the most fundamental information about habit formation, so you can accomplish more by focusing on less."
-Mark Manson, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck
 
“James Clear has spent years honing the art and studying the science of habits. This engaging, hands-on book is the guide you need to break bad routines and make good ones.”
-Adam Grant, New York Times best-selling author of Originals, Give and Take, and Option B with Sheryl Sandberg

"A special book that will change how you approach your day and live your life."
-Ryan Holiday, bestselling author of The Obstacle is the Way and Ego is the Enemy

“As a physician attempting to help my patients build healthy habits to decrease and reverse chronic disease,  Atomic Habits is the playbook I have been searching for. Not only does the book offer actionable items I can teach my patients, I can refer them to read and implement the ideas themselves. The format is powerful and simple. This should be taught in all medical schools.”
-Laurie Marbas, MD, United States Air Force veteran

Atomic Habits was a great read. I learned a lot and think it’ll be helpful to a lot of people.”
—Gayle King, co-anchor of CBS This Morning and editor-at-large for O, The Oprah Magazine
 
“Useful new book”
Wall Street Journal
 
“In Atomic Habits, Clear will show you how to overcome a lack of motivation, change your environment to encourage success, and make time for new (and better) habits.
–Glamour.com
 
Atomic Habits is a great book for anyone who is frustrated with the way they can’t seem to kick that one (or two dozen) bad habit(s) and wants to finally achieve health, fitness, financial freedom, great relationships, and a good life.”
–Medium.com
 
“Excellent. Well worth the read.” 
–Benjamin Hardy, Inc.com

About the Author

James Clear''s work has appeared in the New York Times, Time, and Entrepreneur, and on CBS This Morning, and is taught in colleges around the world. His website, jamesclear.com, receives millions of visitors each month, and hundreds of thousands subscribe to his email newsletter. He is the creator of The Habits Academy, the premier training platform for organizations and individuals that are interested in building better habits in life and work.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis. Too often, we convince ourselves that massive success requires massive action. Whether it is losing weight, building a business, writ­ing a book, winning a championship, or achieving any other goal, we put pressure on ourselves to make some earth- shattering improvement that everyone will talk about.

Meanwhile, improving by 1 percent isn’t particularly notable—sometimes it isn’t even noticeable—but it can be far more meaningful, especially in the long run. The difference a tiny improvement can make over time is astounding. Here’s how the math works out: if you can get 1 percent better each day for one year, you’ll end up thirty-seven times better by the time you’re done. Conversely, if you get 1 percent worse each day for one year, you’ll decline nearly down to zero. What starts as a small win or a minor setback accumulates into something much more.

Habits are the compound interest of self-improvement. The same way that money multiplies through compound interest, the effects of your habits multiply as you repeat them. They seem to make little dif­ference on any given day and yet the impact they deliver over the months and years can be enormous. It is only when looking back two, five, or perhaps ten years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.

This can be a difficult concept to appreciate in daily life. We often dismiss small changes because they don’t seem to matter very much in the moment. If you save a little money now, you’re still not a million­aire. If you go to the gym three days in a row, you’re still out of shape. If you study Mandarin for an hour tonight, you still haven’t learned the language. We make a few changes, but the results never seem to come quickly and so we slide back into our previous routines.
Unfortunately, the slow pace of transformation also makes it easy to let a bad habit slide. If you eat an unhealthy meal today, the scale doesn’t move much. If you work late tonight and ignore your family, they will forgive you. If you procrastinate and put your project off until tomorrow, there will usually be time to finish it later. A single decision is easy to dismiss.

But when we repeat 1 percent errors, day after day, by replicating poor decisions, duplicating tiny mistakes, and rationalizing little ex­cuses, our small choices compound into toxic results. It’s the accumu­lation of many missteps—1 percent decline here and there—that eventually leads to a problem.

The impact created by a change in your habits is similar to the effect of shifting the route of an airplane by just a few degrees. Imagine you are flying from Los Angeles to New York City. If a pilot leaving from LAX adjusts the heading just 3.5 degrees south, you will land in Washington, D.C., instead of New York. Such a small change is barely noticeable at takeoff—the nose of the airplane moves just a few feet—but when magni­fied across the entire United States, you end up hundreds of miles apart.

Similarly, a slight change in your daily habits can guide your life to a very different destination. Making a choice that is 1 percent better or 1 percent worse seems insignificant in the moment, but over the span of moments that make up a lifetime these choices determine the differ­ence between who you are and who you could be. Success is the prod­uct of daily habits—not once‑in‑a‑lifetime transformations.

That said, it doesn’t matter how successful or unsuccessful you are right now. What matters is whether your habits are putting you on the path toward success. You should be far more concerned with your cur­rent trajectory than with your current results. If you’re a millionaire but you spend more than you earn each month, then you’re on a bad trajectory. If your spending habits don’t change, it’s not going to end well. Conversely, if you’re broke, but you save a little bit every month, then you’re on the path toward financial freedom—even if you’re mov­ing slower than you’d like.

Your outcomes are a lagging measure of your habits. Your net worth is a lagging measure of your financial habits. Your weight is a lagging measure of your eating habits. Your knowledge is a lagging measure of your learning habits. Your clutter is a lagging measure of your cleaning habits. You get what you repeat.

If you want to predict where you’ll end up in life, all you have to do is follow the curve of tiny gains or tiny losses, and see how your daily choices will compound ten or twenty years down the line. Are you spending less than you earn each month? Are you making it into the gym each week? Are you reading books and learning something new each day? Tiny bat­tles like these are the ones that will define your future self.

Time magnifies the margin between success and failure. It will multiply whatever you feed it. Good habits make time your ally. Bad habits make time your enemy.

Habits are a double-edged sword. Bad habits can cut you down just as easily as good habits can build you up, which is why understanding the details is crucial. You need to know how habits work and how to design them to your liking, so you can avoid the dangerous half of the blade.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
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Haical Sajovic Haddad
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Updated review after 100 days building small yet lasting habits.
Reviewed in the United States on October 17, 2018
I previously wrote this review right after reading the book. Today, February 15th, after applying James’s system for 100 days on a few tiny habits, I feel compelled to share updates with you because they have sincerely worked. I will divide the review into 5... See more
I previously wrote this review right after reading the book. Today, February 15th, after applying James’s system for 100 days on a few tiny habits, I feel compelled to share updates with you because they have sincerely worked.

I will divide the review into 5 parts. The first part is a summary of the book with short excerpts highlighted while taking notes. Next, I hope to share pieces of advice that have motivated me while building new habits. Following that, I will share how I implemented the first 3 habits throughout these months. Then, some thoughts to whom I would recommend reading the book. Last, there are 4 complementary readings.

SUMMARY

[Introduction] James starts by sharing personal strategies he implemented to recover from a serious accident in high school. That event forced him to improve the quality of his routine to get his life in order, coming to the conclusion that “we all deal with setbacks, but in the long run, the quality of our lives often depends on the quality of our habits. With the same habits, you will end up with the same results. But with better habits, anything is possible.”

[Section I : The Fundamentals]

[Chapter 1] Here we learn the power of compounding effect: changes that seem small and unimportant at any given day will compound into remarkable results if we are willing to stick with them for months and years. James explains that “breakthrough moments are often the result of many previous actions, which build up the potential required to unleash a major change.” Comparing to habits, he shows that bamboo can barely be seen during the first couple of years while the roots grow underground before exploding for almost 100 feet into the air in a few weeks. From that perspective, we come to understand the best outcomes are generally delayed.

[Chapter 2] Based on a 3-layer concentric circle behavior change model—divided into outcome change, process change, and identity change—James explains that we should pay attention to our inner identity by focusing on beliefs, assumptions, and values. “Many people begin the process of changing their habits by focusing on what they want to achieve. This leads us to outcome-based habits. The alternative is to build identity-based habits. With this approach, we start by focusing on who we wish to become.” The strongest changes, then, happen from inside out, starting from our identity, passing through the process, and ultimately changing the outcome.

[Chapter 3] In this chapter we are introduced to a 4-step framework, which is composed of cue, craving, response, and reward. James calls it ''The 4 Laws of Behavior Change''. He then explains that we can think of each law as a lever that influences our behavior—when the levers are in the right positions, they create good habits effortless whereas when they are in the wrong position, it is nearly impossible. Through examples, he explains that “the cue triggers a craving, which motivates a response, which provides a reward, which satisfies the craving and, ultimately, becomes associated with the cue.” Together they create a habit loop that, when repeated many times, habits become automatic.

[Section II : Make It Obvious]

[Chapter 4] A primer on how cues play a crucial role in predicting habit formation without consciously thinking about the outcomes. Once our habits become so common, the cues associated with them become essentially invisible because they are deeply encoded. If we want to create better habits, a good idea is to be aware of the cues. James finishes up by sharing a strategy called ''Habits Scorecard''—a simple exercise to become more aware of our behavior on a daily basis. We first write down a chronological list of our daily habits and, once we have a full list, we score each habit as an effective, ineffective, or neutral habit. Besides noticing what is actually going on, we can notice if certain behaviors help us become the type of person we wish to be.

[Chapter 5] The cues that can trigger a habit come in a wide range of forms, and the 2 most common cues are time and location. When we make a specific plan for when and where we will perform a new habit, we are more likely to follow through. Stacking our habits by pairing a new habit with a current habit is a form to connect our behavior to our own advantage. An example when building a daily journaling habit would be: “after I pour my cup of coffee each morning, I will journal for 5 minutes.”

[Chapter 6] This chapter shows how our environment plays a crucial role in defining habit behaviors. “Given that we are more dependent on vision than any other sense, it should come as no surprise that visual cues are the greatest catalyst of our behavior.” To build good habits, then, we should either make desirable cues obvious in our environment or build new habits in a new environment to avoid fighting against old ones.

[Chapter 7] One of the most practical ways to break a bad habit is to reduce exposure to the cue that causes it. As James points out, “it is easier to avoid temptation than resist it.”

[Section III : Make It Attractive]

[Chapter 8] James explains how the modern food industry has created products that are more attractive and addictive to consumers, and by doing so he shows that the more attractive an opportunity is, the more likely it is to become habit-forming. Every behavior that is highly habit-forming tends to be associated with higher levels of dopamine. It is the anticipation of a reward that motivates us to take action. “Temptation bundling is one way to make your habits more attractive. The strategy is to pair an action you want to do with an action you need to do.”

[Chapter 9] “We tend to adopt habits that are praised and approved of by our culture because we have a strong desire to fit in and belong to the tribe.” That said, it is common to pick up habits and behaviors from our parents, peers, and colleagues. There is also a tremendous internal pressure to comply with the norms of the tribe. And, finally, we try to copy the behavior of successful people because we desire success ourselves. One of the best strategies to build better habits is to join a culture where the desired behavior is the normal behavior.

[Chapter 10] To avoid unnecessary and detrimental cravings, we should highlight the benefits of avoiding a bad habit by making it seem unattractive. “Habits are unattractive when we associate them with negative feelings.”

[Section IV : Make It Easy]

[Chapter 11] “All habits follow a similar trajectory from effortful practice to automatic behavior, a process known as automaticity. Automaticity is the ability to perform a behavior without thinking about each step, which occurs when the nonconscious mind takes over.” The key component is to pay close attention to the frequency we perform a habit, not much for how long we have been practicing it.

[Chapter 12] Since every action requires a certain amount of energy, we are motivated to do what is easy. By contrast, the more energy required, the less likely it is to occur. “You don''t actually want the habit itself. What you really want is the outcome the habit delivers. The greater the obstacle, the more friction there is between you and your desired end state.” That is why we should reduce the friction associated with our habits by creating a prosperous environment to make future actions easier.

[Chapter 13] There are decisive moments that deliver an outsized impact every single day. As James puts, these decisive moments are a fork in the road, sending us in the direction of a productive path or an unproductive one. To avoid procrastination, the skill of ''Showing Up'' says that we should start a new habit by taking baby steps, making it as easy as possible to take action. “A new habit should not feel like a challenge. The actions that follow can be challenging, but the first 2 minutes should be easy. What you want is a gateway habit that naturally leads you down a more productive path.” He calls it the ''Two-Minute Rule'', meaning that new habits should take less than 2 minutes to do in the beginning. Once the habit is established we can improve and master the finer details.

[Chapter 14] In order to keep bad habits away is to make them difficult in the first place. There are 2 interesting strategies to improve our future behavior. [1] Make good choices in advance before we can fall victim to temptation in the future. James gives a personal example by sharing that whenever he is looking to cut calories he will ask the waiter to split his meal and box half of it to go before the meal is served. If, however, he waits for the meal to be served and tries to eat just half, that would never happen. [2] Make onetime actions that can automate our future habits and deliver increasing returns over time such as buying a good water filter, unsubscribing from unwanted emails, moving to a friendlier neighborhood, buying a standing desk, or setting up automatic bill pay.

[Section V : Make It Satisfying]

[Chapter 15] We should make sure to feel immediately satisfied after performing a new habit to increase the odds that the behavior will be repeated next time. “The human brain has evolved to prioritize immediate rewards over delayed rewards.” For that, we can add a little bit of immediate pleasure to the habits that pay off in the long-run.

[Chapter 16] Here we learn how to measure our progress by tracking our habits. The immediate satisfaction it delivers—as mentioned earlier in Chapter 15—is one of the many benefits that standout. Besides that, James says, “when we get a signal that we are moving forward, we become more motivated to continue down that path.” The most basic format to track our habits is to get a calendar and mark an X each time we stick with our routine. One of the most important passages of the entire book is as follows: “If you miss one day, try to get back into it as quickly as possible. The first mistake is never the one that ruins you. It is the spiral of repeated mistakes that follows. Missing once is an accident. Missing twice is the start of a new habit. This is a distinguishing feature between winners and losers. Anyone can have a bad performance, a bad workout, or a bad day at work. But when successful people fail, they rebound quickly.”

[Chapter 17] In order to prevent bad habits and/or eliminate unhealthy behaviors, James says that we could either add an instant cost to the action or make it painful. A habit contract is also another strategy to hold our accountability: “It is a verbal or written agreement in which you state your commitment to a particular habit and the punishment that will occur if you don''t follow through. Then you find one to two people to act as your accountability partners and sign off on the contract with you.”

[Section VI : Advanced Techniques]

[Chapter 18] We learn how to distinguish habits when genes may or may not influence our performance especially for competitive activities. “One of the best ways to ensure your habits remain satisfying over the long-run is to pick behaviors that align with your personality and skills.” James proposes us to set some time apart to explore new activities in the beginning, before shifting our focus to exploit them thoroughly.

[Chapter 19] When we find the sweet spot of our ability we tend to learn best and fastest. The ‘Goldilocks Rule’ states that "humans experience peak motivation when working on tasks that are right on the edge of their current abilities. Not too hard. Not too easy. Just right.”

[Chapter 20] One downside of certain habits, James explains, is that we may stop paying attention to the little details and errors. To counterbalance that we should review and reflect on the process over time to remain conscious of our own performance. Using a simple chart to convey his message, we learn that “the process of mastery requires that you progressively layer improvements on top of one another, each habit building upon the last until a new level of performance has been reached and a higher range of skills has been internalized.”

PERSONAL THOUGHTS

Reading the book twice helped me take better notes and capture details. In the meantime, I thought about 3 simple strategies that could improve our adherence to new habits. Let me share these strategies here with you, and in the following section, I will describe how I managed to cultivate the first 3 new habits upon reading the book—following the system proposed by James together with these 3 strategies.

[1] The first strategy is about determining a ''commitment time frame'' to avoid excuses during this initial trial period. A 1-month time frame is a fair commitment, choosing to start on the first day of the month to practice it every single day for a full month. Just at the end of the period, I will take the time to reflect and evaluate the pros and cons.

[2] The next one is to choose only 1 new habit each month. In doing so we become familiar with the practice intentionally while we develop a sense of purpose.

[3] Last, during the first month of any new habit, I noticed that if I spend time exploring the details and the benefits, my motivation stays high. It doesn''t only help us create better practices, but it is also inspiring to learn from others who have succeeded previously by adding the same habit into their lives. Podcasts, articles, videos, books, online courses, tutorials, and blog posts are all good sources.

IMPLEMENTATION OF NEW HABITS

[Nov 1, 2018] I had been wanting to journal on a daily basis for many years but that had never happened. Although I have carried a notebook with me for quite a while, it has never worked as a real journal—a daily routine, when we sit down and write personal thoughts, intentions, and reflections at around the same time. Instead, it has been mostly used to take notes during meetings, to write down ideas and thoughts, to express travel memories, and to doodle. Today, after 3+ months, I haven''t looked back once, and still can''t believe it took me that long to start this daily habit. During the first month, I read blog posts, watched videos, and even read a short and inexpensive book to foster my creativity.

[Dec 1, 2018] I have been impressed by the physical capabilities we can develop through body movement. Although yoga has been a special part of my life since I was 18, I hadn''t given proper attention to handstands. But now, after 2+ months practicing it every day, it is rewarding to see improvements on a weekly basis. Again, I definitely recommend watching videos and reading tutorials to find your favorite method. This is the perfect habit to stack at the end or in the middle of any physical movement practice you may enjoy.

[Jan 1, 2019] By now we know the benefits of cold showers—ranging from healthier skin appearance all the way to a more resilient perspective of the world. I had previously taken cold showers for 3 months in 2017, but it was a “goal” mindset instead of a “habit” mindset. After that trial I set aside and, although I have kept taking cold showers once or twice a week since then, I wished cold showers was the default mode. Now, after 1+ month, I can''t see myself taking warm showers. After all, it is about intention. Again, we can learn uncountable benefits of cold showers by reading success stories. One of my inspirations was Wim Hof. It isn''t comfortable in the beginning of any chosen day, but after 3-4 minutes, both my breath and thoughts calm down.

Putting them together, these 3 habits don''t take more than 30 minutes of my day. While I spend about 10 minutes journaling and 10 more minutes practicing handstands, I save 5 minutes taking cold showers because I won''t stay any longer than necessary.

RECOMMENDATION

[1] First, if you have watched videos, listened to podcasts, read articles and books on habit formation and, after all that, you feel satisfied, then, please, save your money and time.

[2] However, if you are like me, that even after reading a few books on building habits and having successfully added good habits to your life, feel that there is still room for improvement, this book can be a terrific addition.

[3] Last, if you haven''t spent much time and energy discovering a good system to build lasting habits while breaking bad ones, please, read this book.

COMPLEMENTARY READINGS

[1] Game Changers, by Dave Asprey, exposed me to a wealth array of ideas/habits/tools that have helped me decide which new habit to build next. The book is divided into 46 laws.

[2] Essentialism, by Greg McKeown, helped me focus on less but more important tasks, giving clarity to what matters most. This is especially interesting to break bad habits.

[3] The Talent Code, by Daniel Coyle, brought more motivation when learning new skills based on the assumptions that we develop new talents through deep practices, finding our ignition identity, and having the right coach to guide us genuinely. I read it many years ago, then, a few years back, I read his following book called The Little Book of Talent—which is perhaps even more to the point.

[4] The Systems View of Life, by Fritjof Capra, enlightened my perspectives on how nature and living beings are systematically integrated. It is a profound and slightly academic book that can complement Atomic Habits especially to tie together the 4-step framework into the feedback loop system.

I sincerely hope you, too, have fun while building new habits.

Take care,

Haical
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Tom Venuto, Author of Burn the Fat, Feed The Muscle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Huge toolkit of actionable, practical, organized strategies to build positive habits
Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2018
I''ve read a lot of books on changing behavior and building habits and James Clear''s Atomic Habits is my new favorite. This book is different from others in the way it covers an enormous amount of ground in the larger area of self-improvement while seamlessly tying all... See more
I''ve read a lot of books on changing behavior and building habits and James Clear''s Atomic Habits is my new favorite. This book is different from others in the way it covers an enormous amount of ground in the larger area of self-improvement while seamlessly tying all these ideas back into the central theme of habits.

One of the core concepts in Atomic Habits is to focus on the small improvement. The impact a 1% improvement per day can make may appear negligible at first, but Clear makes a compelling argument that in the case of habits, thinking small produces the biggest results over time. "Habits are the compound interest of self-improvement," explains Clear.

Over the months and years, the accumulated effect of small habitual daily behaviors is staggering. Early in the book we are also warned that this compounding works both ways, so we''d better make sure we''re making it work in the positive direction, not for the negative.

This is a concept I was introduced to years ago under a different name - Kaizen - the Japanese term for continuous incremental improvement. What''s different and new in this book is how the concept is applied specifically to building habits.

I found the information introduced in chapter two about behavior change at the identity level to be spot-on. You''re also given a simple two-step process for changing your identity and this one idea alone is incredibly powerful.

In chapter three, we are introduced to the habit loop - cue, craving, response, reward - and we learn how to build good habits in 4 simple steps and break bad habits in 4 simple steps.

One of those steps to habit formation, which goes hand in hand with the 1% concept, is how to make it not only small, but easy. In the chapters that follow, this is exactly what you find out.

Other ideas of great value that stood out included, habit stacking (the best way to form a new habit), habit tracking, habit shaping and how to design your environment - physical and social - for habit building success. You learn the truth about self-control, how to stop procrastinating and how to use implementation intentions, temptation bundling and motivational rituals. The book is simply packed with actionable ideas, tactics and strategies.

Virtually every idea in the book is useful and resonated with me. While I may not agree that we should "forget about goals," I agree with one of Clear''s core principles in the book - that we must develop systems for change. If we only focus on goals and don''t develop systems and a focus on the process, we risk falling into a number of goal-related traps which ultimately lead to stagnation. With the right systems, we''re rewarded with continuous improvement on a lifelong journey of success.

Another difference between Atomic Habits and other books in this genre is that while it''s based on science it doesn''t bog you down with unnecessary details of the research. Clear''s book is intensely practical, giving you a huge toolkit of organized and named strategies you can apply immediately to create and strengthen positive habits and stop the negative ones.

The book is conversational, and includes many interesting stories, making it easy to read - and hard to put down (I read it cover to cover in one day).

It''s possible this might become your most highlighted personal improvement book because every page is so chocked full of memorable and quotable gems of advice.
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Cady Macon
5.0 out of 5 stars
Adrenaline Junkie HYPES Habits. (What?! Read on, friend...)
Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2018
Disclaimer: I scored the jackpot and got my grubby paws on this early. I didn''t see myself getting especially excited about this book. I was like, "OK James. I like you. You seem like a nice guy. Your work is very link-able and that''s made my life simpler on... See more
Disclaimer: I scored the jackpot and got my grubby paws on this early.

I didn''t see myself getting especially excited about this book. I was like, "OK James. I like you. You seem like a nice guy. Your work is very link-able and that''s made my life simpler on many an occasion. I TOTALLY FEEL SPECIAL because you have involved me (*marginally) in your ~process~. But habits? *yawn* What-evvvvver. Btw, I already know LIKE EV-UH-RYTHING because I read Charles Duhigg''s book and was early on the Fogg method game. Ergo: I am The Expert. Bow down b*tches." <--Ok just kidding on that last line. But BA-sicallyy.

My inner world is................. a special place.

I didn''t think I was going to get hype about a book about habits, yet here we are. I am hype about a book.... about habits. Why??? Why has this drama-loving, big picture adoring, enthusiastic creature shifted keys to start singing song of habits? Because it''s unflattering. And that''s EXACTLY why we need to self-examine.

Here''s the thing:
Every person reading this review (also, hi!) has bad habits.
Every person reading this review has good ones.
And - I would wager - every person reading this review has unfinished business.

There''s some dream, change, or new echelon of self-actualization you have yet to inhabit. The problem isn''t your ambitions -- it''s your habits. James wrote something powerful I will directly quote when writing with book in hand. The message is this: success isn''t determined by the scale of your dreams. Winners and losers have the same dreams. But the winners have better habits.

There are a number of ~juicy nuggets~ that will come out of the woodwork to slap your b*tch-ass into line. I doubled back on more than one occasion. Check out his Instagram -- he''s been sharing a number of nice one liners. But if you''re like......... 80% of the way there, you might as well.

This book is:
- Actionable
- Pragmatic
- Grounded <-- woah!
- Science-y
- Sweet
- Readable <-- nice.

My advice:
1. If you''re this deep in the reviews section, buy the book.
2. Seriously, buy the book.
3. While you wait for it to arrive, mentally accept that James Clear will not personally pry the donut from your grip and supervise your situps.
4. Open your Amazon package.
5. Read the book.
6. Learn things.
7. Implement said things.
8. Rinse repeat.
9. *Flourish*

Thanks for reading along. It''s been an honor! *hat tip, bows*
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BLTop Contributor: Pets
3.0 out of 5 stars
Informative but requires email to get any additional materials
Reviewed in the United States on October 19, 2018
I got this through Audible (audiobook format). I thought it strange that one of the reviewers mentioned that the author kept mentioning his website. He does, but I didn''t think anything of it. Going through the book (ie. listening to it), I was interested in the habits... See more
I got this through Audible (audiobook format). I thought it strange that one of the reviewers mentioned that the author kept mentioning his website. He does, but I didn''t think anything of it. Going through the book (ie. listening to it), I was interested in the habits report card. I typically listen 2X, so the URL went by quickly. Later when I had some time I thought easy peasy, just Google atomic habits score card.

The search revealed no real tangible links. Using the book title as the URL, it redirects to his website''s page for the book. And that page is more or less just a sales page.

No biggie I think, its I the audiobook, I just need to go back and find it. I think this is a reasonable defense to have people use an explicit url to get to the info. I backtrack and find the url. Type it in my browser ... and ... you need to give him your email.

I already bought your book. I get enough spam as it is and I don''t want to be on a mailing list. Disappointing.
688 people found this helpful
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Kiki
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Save your money
Reviewed in the United States on January 22, 2019
I had high hopes for this but it is way too wordy. The information in this book could easily be communicated in half the amount of pages. It is all filler and I quickly lost interest.
407 people found this helpful
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Lisa Ryan Stampfli
1.0 out of 5 stars
Not Worth it
Reviewed in the United States on November 10, 2018
I was quite disappointed in this book given the reviews. It could be summed up in a couple of pages. There is no plan for making improvements in your life, just a few obvious observations about habits that are repeated over and over. Not worth the time or money.
454 people found this helpful
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Tokolosh
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointed - nothing new nor atomic
Reviewed in the United States on January 6, 2019
I have been receiving James Clear''s newsletter for several months so when the book got out I ordered the kindle version immediately. But while the newsletter is occasionally interesting, the book is rather empty. There''s nothing new, it''s just a rehash of other books on the... See more
I have been receiving James Clear''s newsletter for several months so when the book got out I ordered the kindle version immediately. But while the newsletter is occasionally interesting, the book is rather empty. There''s nothing new, it''s just a rehash of other books on the subject. There is no new perspective, no new insights. And there''s nothing atomic about it. I am really disappointed, and I could not believe that the book became an instant best seller. If you have never read anything about habit forming, you will benefit from this book. But if you have, I don''t see what you can get from Atomic Habits. I am also becoming tired of all the personal success stories from book authors because they can''t be applied to the layman. I found there was nothing to learn from James'' baseball days, as I never was an athlete and never excelled in sport. Feels like the average reader can''t do this. I have bought the audible and Kindle version and will return one of them, keeping the other just to be fair to the author
344 people found this helpful
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Brad Revell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the best books I have read in 2018! It is worth reading as it will change your life.
Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2018
Over the past few years I have been an avid reader of James Clear’s posts and emails. His blogs and other articles have provided me with a solid structure and framework on habit building thereby driving both achievement and fulfilment in everything I do in life. Whether it... See more
Over the past few years I have been an avid reader of James Clear’s posts and emails. His blogs and other articles have provided me with a solid structure and framework on habit building thereby driving both achievement and fulfilment in everything I do in life. Whether it is healthy eating, hitting the gym, or keeping my focus in the work environment his advice, tools and approaches have greatly benefited me.

I was fortunate enough to get a pre-release copy of Atomic Habits and jumped straight into it. It isn’t a long read, however, it is structured in a way that provides a good overview of why habits are important, tools and techniques on how to establish habits as well as a plethora of real life examples. James also makes reference to an additional set of tools on the Atomic Habits website which you can also leverage (e.g. habit trackers, cheat sheets, guides etc.)

The book centres on the both on the four stages of developing a habit and the laws of behaviour change. The latter he delves into in great detail, again with many examples on how to apply within your own life given constraints. The book had a nice pace and balance on theory and application.

The biggest thing I have learned (also from his blogs) is the difference between goals and habits. For example, instead of setting a goal, create an identity and establish small habits that align to that identity. For example, don’t say you want to lose weight, but rather identify with being a healthy person that exercises most days and eats well. The habits might be drinking x amount of water a day, 10 push-ups a day, walking 10,000 steps per day etc; and increase the habits once they are firmly established.

Given the applicability of this topic, it is a book everyone should read. Unfortunately there are many key areas we don’t get educated on at school. This is one area that is important for life in everything that we do. Highly recommend Atomic Habits!

Three key takeaways from the book:

1. Habit stacking. Put your clothes out next to your bed before going to sleep so that when you wake up it is the first thing you do or think about. That habit will then drive the habit to go to the gym etc.
2. Look to establish identity habits versus reaching for goals or developing finite habits. Habits based on beliefs are much more powerful.
3. When it comes to wanting to do something (good or bad) 90% of the dopamine release is driven by the desire versus and 10% on the actual experience.
194 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Pimlico reader
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Treasure trove of tips on how to manage habits, but let down by unresolved contradictions
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 10, 2019
This is a wonderful book for tips on how to manage habits. But the author is more of a presenter of information than a clear thinker, and more work is needed to resolve some of the contradictions in his presentation. For example, he uses the term "habit" to refer to three...See more
This is a wonderful book for tips on how to manage habits. But the author is more of a presenter of information than a clear thinker, and more work is needed to resolve some of the contradictions in his presentation. For example, he uses the term "habit" to refer to three quite different things without taking into account the differences: First, what one might call "unthinking habits," such as making coffee first thing in the morning, automatically, no decision required, you just do it without thinking, but there is none of the progressive effect that Clear describes as a virtue of "habits." Unthinking habits are all about economy of effort in routine chores. Second, "cumulative habits," which also don''t require a decision or a lot of thought - you just do them, because you have got into the habit - but these result in a cumulative effect over time; for example, exercising after work, which can lead to quite substantial improvements in fitness with a little effort each time over a period of time. Third, what are really "routines" rather than habits: for example, writing 10 pages of your novel before breakfast every morning. Once established, these are initiated each time automatically, because that''s your time to do X, and they are cumulative (10 pages/day adds up to a complete book at some point), but they are most definitely not unthinking or automatic in their execution. These distinctions are important because the three types of habit need to be handled differently. We don''t need to think about automatic habits or even cumulative habits, during the rest of the day. But to make progress with a routine such as writing or any other creative endeavor, a constant mulling over outside the actual time of the routine involvement is essential. The first two are about economy of effort, while the third is about momentum of engagement and reaching a distant target with consistent application over time, but with very little "economy." Another point: Clear says initially that we change our habits by changing our beliefs about ourselves (pp. 32-35), but this is manifestly untenable - believing you are a writer is not the same as actually writing a book, nor does mere belief lead to action. So he is forced to shift the narrative to seeing change of self as a matter of acting in a way that creates the person we want to be, by developing the right habits (as Aristotle described this), and there he is on sounder ground. But it would be helpful to the reader if he worked out these untenable lines of thinking beforehand and avoided taking the reader down them altogether. Timothy Corwen (author, The Worth of a Person; https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1790698391/)
452 people found this helpful
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Tushar Joshi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Atomic Habits by James Clear is highly recommended read
Reviewed in India on October 27, 2018
I was aware of many concepts of this book through the web site of the author jamesclear.com In fact that the place from where I came to know James first time. The article on habits where he mentions process is important than goals was my starting point. I continued reading...See more
I was aware of many concepts of this book through the web site of the author jamesclear.com In fact that the place from where I came to know James first time. The article on habits where he mentions process is important than goals was my starting point. I continued reading his updates through the consistent newsletter he publishes through his site. Once the book was announced and available it was a no brainer for me to purchase my own copy to have all the concepts in one place and to go through the ideas in succession. This book provides supplementary material like cheat sheet and templates which are very useful for planning your own habit profile and continuous improvement. This book is action oriented. The concepts present an action plan for trying them in your own situation and to practice the ideas directly in day to day life. This makes the book an instruction manual for nurturing good habits and killing bad habits. I was able to immediately relate to many new habits to start and many not so good habits I can stop and avoid using the identification pattern provided in the book. The principle presented in the book about understanding who to become, that is finding out what identity to achieve instead of just starting or stopping a habit is very helpful. One important aspect of this book is the to the point summary provided after every chapter. Once you have read the book this summary helps recall all the concepts in short time and becomes a concise model to revise the concepts. The book is engaging and is suitable for reading cover to cover as it provides many stories and references. As the concept of process than goals was already known to me through the Learning How to Learn MOOC at Coursera, I was glad to find the same concept mentioned in this book and was able to relate quickly with the principles. The book also becomes a workbook and reference material once you have gone through it. The chapters are divided into sections which can be referred for particular situation in hand. I will recommend this book for anyone who is eager to understand why habits are formed and how to nurture good habits and avoid bad ones.
607 people found this helpful
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Pravin Poojary.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beware!! This Book can change your Life :)
Reviewed in India on November 16, 2018
And I absolutely mean it what I said in Headline of my comment. I have been following jamesclear.com from very long. His one article has absolutely changed my life, imagine what this book can offer to you. I have been chasing to build many habits and experimenting with them...See more
And I absolutely mean it what I said in Headline of my comment. I have been following jamesclear.com from very long. His one article has absolutely changed my life, imagine what this book can offer to you. I have been chasing to build many habits and experimenting with them a lot but I would always find a bit difficult to stay with my changed behavior and then while browsing on internet studying more on habits formation I stumbled on James''s articles and boy this guy has the answer for habit formation. If you are looking to form a new habit you have to read this Book. I have never commented online on any of the books that I have read but this one deserves a lot of appreciation. This one is for you James, in future if you ever read this comment I want to tell you that your work has hugely impacted my life. And I express my huge gratitude towards your work on Atomic Habits and the articles you post. Thank a lot for this :)
418 people found this helpful
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anon9668
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Solid Skimmer
Reviewed in Canada on July 31, 2020
This is a solid skimmer. Just another supposed groundbreaking self-help book from some guy who has been declared an expert by repeating well known ideas to a corporate audience and can effectively write for the masses at a sixth grade level. This book is a...See more
This is a solid skimmer. Just another supposed groundbreaking self-help book from some guy who has been declared an expert by repeating well known ideas to a corporate audience and can effectively write for the masses at a sixth grade level. This book is a pseudo-intellectual approach to the well known. These are all ideas that I have heard expressed better elsewhere and there isn''t a single unique idea in the book. It''s a book by a guy with a silver tongue, mediocre research skills, and who found a publisher with a good copy editor. It wouldn''t be so cringey to read if he didn''t refer to concepts as "Laws" which they are not, and proper noun "Principles" which is also barely true. Talk about self aggrandizing. There is a lot of repetition here as well. This whole book could have been written in 75 pages. There''s nothing wrong with buying this book if you think it will help but I recommend reading the first couple of chapters and then reading chapter summaries to determine if you already know the content. Then you can dive in on anything that is new to you. I spent about an hour going cover to cover. See if you can get it used or at the Library or something. It''s not worth spending more than a few bucks on.
246 people found this helpful
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Matt Evans
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
You know everything already.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 18, 2019
I bought this book as I listened to an interview with James Clear on a podcast and found him interesting. His book, however was disappointing. It follows the typical self-help formula of common sense and old ideas combined with overly simplistic charts and celebrity...See more
I bought this book as I listened to an interview with James Clear on a podcast and found him interesting. His book, however was disappointing. It follows the typical self-help formula of common sense and old ideas combined with overly simplistic charts and celebrity anecdotes to remind you of what you already know. That said, sometimes you do need the reminder. And I did pick up a few useful tips. So it’s worth the read. But don’t expect anything special.
214 people found this helpful
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