Crossing the Heart of Africa: wholesale discount An Odyssey of Love and Adventure outlet sale

Crossing the Heart of Africa: wholesale discount An Odyssey of Love and Adventure outlet sale

Crossing the Heart of Africa: wholesale discount An Odyssey of Love and Adventure outlet sale
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Banff Mountain Book Awards WINNER

The spellbinding true story of retracing the extraordinary trek of Ewart "the Leopard" Grogan—the legendary British explorer who, in order to win the woman he loved, attempted to become the first person to cross Africa

In 1898 the dashing British adventurer Ewart Grogan fell head-over-heels in love—but before he could marry, he needed the approval of his beloved''s skeptical, aristocratic stepfather. Grogan, seeking to prove his worth and earn his love''s hand, then set out on an epic quest to become the first man to cross the entire length of Africa, from Cape Town to Cairo, "a feat hitherto thought by many explorers to be impossible" (New York Times).

A little more than a century later, American journalist Julian Smith also found himself madly in love with his girlfriend of seven years... but he was terrified by the prospect of marraige. Inspired by Grogan''s story, which he discovered by chance, Smith decided to face his fears of commitment by retracing the explorer''s amazing—but now forgotten—4,500-mile journey for love and glory through Africa. Crossing the Heart of Africa is the unforgettable account of these twin adventures, as Smith beautifully ineterweaves his own contemporary journey with Grogan''s larger-than-life tale of cannibal attacks, charging elephants, deadly jungles, and romantic triumph.

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN TRAVEL WRITERS WESTERN WRITING AWARDS WINNER: GOLD PRIZE (TRAVEL)

BANFF MOUNTAIN BOOK COMPETITION WINNER: SPECIAL JURY MENTION

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF JOURNALISTS AND AUTHORS AWARDS BEST-BOOK WINNER: MEMOIR

From Booklist

Smith’s strong interest in the forgotten, nineteenth-century Victorian explorer Ewart Grogan compelled him to attempt a similar journey in 2007. Both walked across Africa, covering more than 4,000 miles through eight countries, though Grogan attempted to become the first person to walk across Africa. Both men had something to prove: Grogan wanted his fiancée’s family to know that he was more than a gold digger, and Smith wanted to experience the journey before his own marriage. The interwoven stories contrast an early adventure with a modern Africa, with the remnants of Burton and Speke’s search for the source of the Nile running through it. Grogan’s adventures in Africa are carefully researched: from dodging cannibals, wild animals, and multiple illnesses to his death, when he was virtually forgotten. Smith, an award-winning journalist, tells his own story nearly a century later, as well as revealing a modern continent going through constant change. --Jay Freeman

Review

"Julian Smith, a talented travel writer...evokes Grogan, his adventures and his world with both insight and panache...and matchless skill." (Washington Post)

"The story is not only a modern-day travelogue, but also a great historical account of a charming trailblazer, and the story of a modern-day relationship." Miami Herald)

"Smoothly written chronicle that''s part travelogue, part contemporary relationship commentary, and all heart." (Kirkus Reviews)

"Like David Grann''s The Lost City of Z, this is two stories, of an explorer and of the author''s search for him, and both are compelling. Recommended for...anyone who has ever been or wants to go on a quest." (Library Journal)

" Smith weaves a fine tale...if you love the Great Age of Adventure, you''ll love this book " (Lonely Planet)

From the Back Cover

The amazing true story of Julian Smith, who retraced the journey of legendary British explorer Ewart "The Leopard" Grogan, the first man to cross the length of Africa, in hopes of also winning the heart of the woman he loved.

In 1898, the dashing young British explorer Ewart “the Leopard” Grogan was in love. In order to prove his mettle to his beloved—and her aristocratic stepfather—he set out on a quest to become the first person to walk across Africa, “a feat hitherto thought by many explorers to be impossible” (New York Times, 1900).

In 2007, thirty-five-year-old American journalist Julian Smith faced a similar problem with his girlfriend of six years . . . and decided to address it in the same way Grogan had more than a hundred years before: he was going to retrace the Leopard’s 4,500-mile journey for love and glory through the lakes, volcanoes, savannas, and crowded modern cities of Africa.

Smith interweaves both adventures into a seamless narrative in Crossing the Heart of Africa: the story of two explorers, a century apart, who both traversed the length of Africa to prove themselves . . . and came back changed men.

About the Author

Julian Smith is an award-winning travel writer whose work has appeared in Outside, National Geographic Adventure, National Geographic Traveler, Smithsonian, Wired, the Washington Post, and the Los Angeles Times, among other publications. He is the author of guidebooks to El Salvador, Ecuador, Virginia, and the southwestern United States, and has won the country''s top travel-writing award from the Society of American Travel Writers. He lives with his wife and daughter in Portland, Oregon.

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4.1 out of 54.1 out of 5
139 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

TV guy
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bland, uninteresting and poorly written: A profound disappointment to this tireless reader of contemporary travel in Africa.
Reviewed in the United States on June 21, 2015
I wanted badly to like this book, but I found it confusingly structured, not very compelling and — most of all — exceedingly poorly written. With many typos. (I read the Kindle version, not the print version. The typos, basically words run together, may have been corrected... See more
I wanted badly to like this book, but I found it confusingly structured, not very compelling and — most of all — exceedingly poorly written. With many typos. (I read the Kindle version, not the print version. The typos, basically words run together, may have been corrected in the print version.)

Perhaps it''s because I made the mistake of reading Crossing the Heart of Africa immediately after reading Richard Grant''s Crazy River: Exploration and Folly in East Africa, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Coincidentally, Grant travels through many of the exact same locales — Tanzania, Burundi and Rwanda — as Smith. Both men are contemporary writers; both books are recent, and have appeared in the past year.

Where Grant is witty, observant, insightful and clearly focused — on his inner self, as well as the world around him — Smith comes across, to me anyway, as weak-willed, aimless and maudlin. His book suffers what — for me — is sloppy structure, flashing haphazardly back-and-forth between the historical record of 19th century explorer Ewart Grogan, his own (not very interesting) romantic affair with his soon-to-be wife, and his oddly vague travels through what is, let''s face it, some really compelling cultural terrain.

Other readers seem to have enjoyed this book. Speaking for myself, though, if you only have time to read one account, I would choose Crazy River over this, in a heartbeat. If you have time to read both, perhaps you''ll come to some of the same conclusions I did.

I confess I was startled at how poorly written Crossing the Heart is. It is so much less detailed and nuanced than I had hoped for, with no sense of "voice." Perhaps I''ve been spoiled by reading too much Paul Theroux. Or Grant, for that matter.

Sorry. Didn''t care for this at all.
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Bernie GourleyTop Contributor: Fantasy Books
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The twin tales of Ewart Grogan''s Cape to Cairo crossing of Africa and Smith''s 2007 attempt to retrace Grogan''s steps
Reviewed in the United States on July 31, 2017
This book tells two tales in parallel, connected by one theme: travel for love. The author, Julian Smith, recounts the experience of Ewart Grogan, an English explorer whose life straddled the 19th and 20th centuries. Grogan traveled the length of Africa from South to North... See more
This book tells two tales in parallel, connected by one theme: travel for love. The author, Julian Smith, recounts the experience of Ewart Grogan, an English explorer whose life straddled the 19th and 20th centuries. Grogan traveled the length of Africa from South to North and recounted his experience in a book entitled “From Cape to Cairo.” The purpose of his grand endeavor was to prove his worth as man. Grogan was in love with a woman whose family was of higher station, and he believed that if he could only do what had never been done before, then the objections to his “marrying up” would dissolve.

The other story is Smith’s own attempt to retrace Grogan’s route across the length of the continent. While Smith doesn’t have to prove his worth, his motivations are more complex and tied up with his engagement to be married. Maybe Smith’s motivation is best summed up as a desire to prove to himself and / or his fiancé that he had sufficient commitment and fortitude to get him through rough times—a characteristic relevant to both marriage and crossing some of the world’s least developed countries.

Of his own admission, Smith’s journey was to be far less arduous than Grogan’s by virtue of the fact that he’d be traveling by taxis, motorcycles, buses, and ferries. Grogan and other 19th century explorers were subject to hazards far graver and more ever-present. For one thing, in Grogan’s day virtually everybody who spent any significant time in Africa got malaria. It wasn’t a question of if but when and how seriously. Even if you escaped malaria, there were myriad other tropical diseases to bring one to one’s knees. Next, there was the tribal environment in which one would travel through dozens of tribal territories, all of whose chiefs expected tribute and many of which were outright hostile. For Smith, rule of law was present in some form or fashion along most of his route, such that no one could just murder him and get off scot-free. There was also the risk of crew desertions that could cripple an expedition. Traveling parties had to carry huge amounts of goods from surveying equipment to gifts to medicines to food stuffs. Still, they had to obtain many of the party’s needs along the route. Among other things, this meant hunting animals that weren’t as docile as livestock. Anything less than an instant kill meant having to trudge into tall grass after a wounded creature that had a far greater killing capacity at close range.

This isn’t to say that Smith’s journey was adventure free. Anyone who has traveled in Africa knows that getting from place to place remains a slow and exhausting process. And many of the things that undermined Grogan’s trip also undermined Smith’s, e.g. the author suffered extended fever. But the most devastating factor for Smith’s travels was the fact that parts of Sudan were lawless and a brutal war was being fought. While Grogan barely managed to drag himself through the swampy landscape, Smith was unable to proceed overland because of the conflict. In telling of his travels, Smith discusses many of the dilemma’s that traveler’s face today (e.g. to give people money or not, how to contend with bureaucrats.) Among the travels that modern-day readers might be interested in is Smith’s visit to a gorilla sanctuary.

I enjoyed this mix of travelogue and history. The book gives one insight into the changing nature of the world and, particularly, what was once called the Dark Continent. [Note: while that may sound either racist or awash in a negativity bias, I’ve read that the reason it was called that was that when the 19th century explorers were traveling through much of the continent was unmapped, i.e. blacked out.]

I’d recommend this book for anyone who is interested in travel in Africa—past or present.
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DH Koester
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Grogan 10--Smith 1
Reviewed in the United States on November 7, 2015
Great idea to use 25 year old Grogan''s 1898 trip across Africa as a counterpoint to Smith''s own attempt to duplicate that journey. It''s like reading two books in one--two adventure stories for the price of one--though crossing Africa in 2007 cannot in many ways compare to... See more
Great idea to use 25 year old Grogan''s 1898 trip across Africa as a counterpoint to Smith''s own attempt to duplicate that journey. It''s like reading two books in one--two adventure stories for the price of one--though crossing Africa in 2007 cannot in many ways compare to crossing in 1898.
Grogan''s motivation seemed to be real, true love whereas Smith''s motivation seemed derived from more selfish, narcissistic reasons. It was the one thing that consistently annoyed me throughout the book--Smith''s almost condescending attitude in his references to his girlfriend. He was lucky to hang on to her in the end.
I enjoyed the sections of the book recounting Grogan''s struggles as he made his way across the continent--incredible accomplishment for a 25 year old man. I commend Smith for undertaking such a trip but his trials and triumphs pale in comparison to Grogan''s. I''d have been more satisfied had the book been entirely about Grogan. Nevertheless worth the read.
"And There I Was" by DH Koester
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William M Glisson
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
2/3 is good
Reviewed in the United States on February 26, 2020
Learning about Grogan was interesting and recreating his trek interesting also. The authors own attempt in modern Africa also compelling. But his telling of his relationship and return to get married could not have been more tedious. I started skipping over them, cause who... See more
Learning about Grogan was interesting and recreating his trek interesting also. The authors own attempt in modern Africa also compelling. But his telling of his relationship and return to get married could not have been more tedious. I started skipping over them, cause who cares?
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sagebrushandsneezes
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great adventure!
Reviewed in the United States on September 20, 2020
I enjoyed every step of the journey. So interesting and well written. Great insights into the history of a place I know very little about. Amazing to consider that a man could have walked from the southern tip to the northern boundary of such a massive continent. Great... See more
I enjoyed every step of the journey. So interesting and well written. Great insights into the history of a place I know very little about. Amazing to consider that a man could have walked from the southern tip to the northern boundary of such a massive continent. Great read.
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Mungo__Park
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
3. 5 stars. I have not much else ...
Reviewed in the United States on July 8, 2018
3.5 stars. I have not much else to add to what 99 other reviewers have already said of the book other than that the author did do a fair job of including interesting historical tidbits about each place he (and Grogan) had visited to on their respective journey''s through... See more
3.5 stars. I have not much else to add to what 99 other reviewers have already said of the book other than that the author did do a fair job of including interesting historical tidbits about each place he (and Grogan) had visited to on their respective journey''s through the "Heart of Africa".
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Sops
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Once again, WHY?
Reviewed in the United States on May 31, 2013
It takes an effort to read this book! You are getting two stories, separated by more then 100 years, which alternate as the tale proceeds. It takes a bit more concentration to follow both tales but the result is an enjoyable trip through parts of Africa with an... See more
It takes an effort to read this book! You are getting two stories, separated by more then 100 years, which alternate as the tale proceeds. It takes a bit more concentration to follow both tales but the result is an enjoyable trip through parts of Africa with an understanding of how things ''have'' or ''have not'' changed over the past years. Personally, I can''t understand the psychological drive that drove Julian Smith to make this particular trip! Maybe bungee jumping off a few bridges would have satisfied his mental requirements and taken less time, then again I am not masochistic, so can''t appreciate that point of view!
2 people found this helpful
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Buyer in VA
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very nice read but lots of typos in Kindle version
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2013
Contents 5 stars, kindle version 3 stars The book is indeed a very interesting read with three story lines intermixed: the original trip back at the turn of the 20th century, the author''s trip in/around 2007 and the development of the relationship between the author... See more
Contents 5 stars, kindle version 3 stars
The book is indeed a very interesting read with three story lines intermixed: the original trip back at the turn of the 20th century, the author''s trip in/around 2007 and the development of the relationship between the author and his girlfriend/fiancee/wife (approx. 2000 - 2008).
Reading the kindle version of this book, I am troubled with the large amount of typos in the kindle version. About once per page two or more words are combined (just "merged") into one. Examples are "Theconstant low-level ..." (location 2418), "The kingdom appearedprosperous ..." (2149), "have been seen to sharpensticks with their teeth" (1988), etc. In this time and age of spell checkers I would have expected far less such problems...
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Top reviews from other countries

Richard Randall
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Africa traverse story spoiled by the author''s personal story.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 20, 2019
The account of Grogan''s extraordinary feat of traversing Africa at the beginning of the 20th century was marred by the biographer''s irrelevant romantic personal experiences, and attempts to follow, by modern transport, part of the route the hero took.
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PB
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A gripping account of a man''s travel adventures in Africa.
Reviewed in India on July 25, 2018
A superbly written book that flop flops a 100 years with ease while narating the adventures of one if the last old time explorers of a world with was soon lost for ever.
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A mazoon customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good book form a different time
Reviewed in Canada on January 15, 2018
A good book form a different time,and place.
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Dr S S Nagi (NYROBE)
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
CROSSING THE HEART OF AFRICA
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 19, 2012
This book was first published in 2010, has 320 pages, 27 B/W photos and 1 map on page 4. The book is dedicated to ''LAURA''. JULIAN SMITH is fascinated by EWART SCOT GROGAN''s(Bwana Chui-1874 to 1967)journey from Cape to Cairo, 112 years ago. What Grogan did for Gertrude,...See more
This book was first published in 2010, has 320 pages, 27 B/W photos and 1 map on page 4. The book is dedicated to ''LAURA''. JULIAN SMITH is fascinated by EWART SCOT GROGAN''s(Bwana Chui-1874 to 1967)journey from Cape to Cairo, 112 years ago. What Grogan did for Gertrude, Smith wanted to do for himself and Laura, living in Portland, Oragon. How much must have changed in Africa? After 24 Hr on Plane to Johannesberg, Smith takes 3 days to arrive in BEIRA, Mozambique(Portugese East Africa). His plan was to take 2 months to complete his journey to CAIRO. He leaves Beira on 24.7.2007, to cover 6,500 miles through 7 more countries. At night he stays at Vila-de-Sena and cycles over ZEMBESI river into MALAWI(Nyasaland). He had done the distance in 3 days, what took Grogan 9 months. From BLANTYRE, he goes to Nkhata Bay to take a ferry on the lake, north. From north of Lake Malawi, Smith takes a bouncy bus to the south of LAKE TANGANYIKA. He suffers from diarrhoea and sickness. From KASONGA, he takes ''LIEMBA'' ferry, the oldest passenger ship in the world(1913), north sailing the east shore. He gets off at KIGOMA and rings Laura. Next he takes a bus to Burundi and stops at BUJUMBURU(Usumbara). Smith,3 weeks into his safari, Grogan had taken 15 months for his. Next, he is in KIGALI, capital of Rwanda and sees graves of genocide in 1994. From his guesthouse at KIBUYE, Smith watches the beautiful LAKE KIVU, which because of geological activity, is now full of methane and CO2. Mt Gotzen(Nyiragongo) had erupted in 2002. They climb SABINYO, one of the VIRUNGA volcanoes, to see gorillas. Then, he crosses into Uganda and takes a motobike taxi to LAKE EDWARD and Katwe. He is on the equator, and stays in a hostel at Queen Elizabeth National Park. Passing Ruwenzori Mountains(MOUNTAINS OF MOON) on his left, Smith''s taxi heads over the equator to FORT PORTAL(Fort Gerry). Through the SEMLIKI Valley and east of LAKE ALBERT, he passes Rhino Camp and WADELAI and arrives at the WHITE NILE. He flies from KAMPALA to JUBA in Sudan. Unable to travel north because of civil war in North Sudan, he takes a plane from Juba to Kampala and rings Laura. He flies home and Laura surprises him by being at New York Airport. They marry on 20.10.2007. Julian Smith mixes his own adventure with those of Grogan, Livingstone, Stanley, Speke and also his life with his Laura. AFRICA HAD CHANGED AND NOT CHANGED since Grogan''s Safari in 1898. Other books of interest are:- (1) From Cape to Cairo, Grogan 1902(2010) (2) The Story of Cape to Cairo Railway, Weinthal 1922 (3) A Cuckoo in Kenya, Robert Foran 1936 (4) Tales of the African Frontier, Hunter 1954 (5) The Man from Cape, Wymer 1959 (6) The Lunatic Express, Charles Miller 1971 (7) The Legendary Grogan, Farrant 1981 (8) Out in the Midday Sun, Elspeth Huxley 1987 (9) Last Lion of Empire, Paice 2001 (10)The Roar of Lion, Frank Coates 2007 Having born in Kenya, I enjoyed reading this book. Read and ENJOY.
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Crossing the Heart of Africa: wholesale discount An Odyssey of Love and Adventure outlet sale

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