Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Description

Product Description

A powerful reinterpretation of the founding of America, by a Pulitzer Prize -- winning historian "The creation of the United States of America is the central event of the past four hundred years," declares Walter McDougall in his preface to Freedom Just Around the Corner. With this statement begins McDougall''s most ambitious, original, and uncompromising of histories. McDougall marshals the latest scholarship and writes in a style redolent of passion, pathos, and humor in pursuit of truths often obscured in books burdened with political slants.

From the origins of English expansion under Henry VIII to the founding of the United States to the rollicking election of President Andrew Jackson, McDougall rescues from myth or oblivion the brave, brilliant, and flawed people who made America great: women and men, native-born and immigrant; German, Latin, African, and British; as well as farmers, engineers, planters, merchants; Protestants, Freemasons, Catholics, and Jews; and -- last but not least -- the American scofflaws, speculators, rogues, and demagogues.

With an insightful approach to the nearly 250 years spanning America''s beginnings, McDougall offers his readers an understanding of the uniqueness of the "American character" and how it has shaped the wide-ranging course of historical events. McDougall explains that Americans have always been in a unique position of enjoying "more opportunity to pursue their ambitions...than any other people in history." Throughout Freedom Just Around the Corner the character of the American people shines, a character built out of a freedom to indulge in the whole panoply of human behavior. The genius behind the success of the United States is founded on the complex, irrepressible American spirit.

A grand narrative rich with new details and insights about colonial and early national history, Freedom Just Around the Corner is the first installment of a trilogy that will eventually bring the story of America up to the present day -- story as epic, bemusing, and brooding as Bob Dylan''s "Jokerman," the ballad that inspires its titles.

From Publishers Weekly

Anyone aspiring to write a multivolume history of the U.S. reckons with illustrious predecessors, especially the histories of Daniel Boorstin and Richard Hofstadter (the latter never completed). But those histories were interpretive; they had a particular slant on the past. McDougall''s is more explanatory. It provides up-to-date understanding of much that happened in our early history but without a sharply etched point of view. It''s thus a bit like a textbook, struggling to keep readers'' attention on all it packs in. Fortunately, in this regard it succeeds wonderfully well. Briskly written, deeply researched, fact-filled and satisfyingly wide in its coverage, it''s mainly a history of the public attributes of the colonies and early nation—the ethnic and racial groups (including Native Americans), its states, religious denominations, political parties, wars and institutions. There''s little social history here or the history of ideas and culture, little about subjects like women, gays, historical myths and memory. But no single history, not even in a projected three volumes, can cover everything. McDougall''s particular strength is that he keeps individuals front and center: the work is alive with humans and their struggles and achievements. Pulitzer Prize–winner McDougall (for The Heavens and the Earth: A Political History of the Space Age) says at the start that his theme will be the conditions that made for Americans'' world-known "hustling" behavior and mentality. Fortunately, he quickly drops this line. There''s a better and more fitting word for people''s desire to better their lot: ambition. That''s what this book has in full measure. Maps not seen by PW.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Bookmarks Magazine

It might be unfashionable these days to embrace “American exceptionalism.” Yet that’s exactly what McDougall, a history professor at the University of Pennsylvania and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Heavens and the Earth: A Political History of the Space Age, has done, to great acclaim. In revealing “who and why we are what we are,” he has written an imaginative, evenhanded, and masterful history that shows the freedoms—and high costs—of our hustling nation. His impressive research covers all the major events of our first 200 years, plus some; he entertains with humorous, passionate writing. Only historian Foner—competitive, perhaps?—criticizes Freedom’s top-heavy approach and inadequate interpretations. The general consensus: Freedom is an important contribution not only to its field, but to all Americans.

Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc.

About the Author

A professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, Walter A. McDougall is the author of many books, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Heavens and the Earth and Let the Sea Make a Noise. . . . He lives in Pennsylvania with his wife and two teenage children.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
46 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

christopher j martin
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Defective Book Deep in Denial
Reviewed in the United States on March 17, 2021
I would first like to make a technical point: The book is defective. It has an unwieldy table of contents. It is not divided effectively into chapters. Finally the notes are all dead links. I would expect this of a $1.99 scan of an out of print book but not of a beek from a... See more
I would first like to make a technical point: The book is defective. It has an unwieldy table of contents. It is not divided effectively into chapters. Finally the notes are all dead links. I would expect this of a $1.99 scan of an out of print book but not of a beek from a living author.

Second, the author is deep in denial of the racial and class injustices that are foundational for this nation. Sure he makes lots of pseudo PC noises, he even argues for the diversity of slave holding and comes up with specious statistical demonstrations that it wasn''t really about rich people who held lots of slaves. Someone should explain to the man that the mean of a pareto distribution, or most any other model you can use for a distribution of wealth, always overstates the prosperity of the person in the middle.

But our author, a Libertarian Bro if there ever was one, has a story to tell about scrappy frontier colonists building a paradise through market magic and land speculation, based on property rights, corporations and the sanctity of contracts. It would never do to dwell on the fact that a great part of the property was kidnapped and enslaved, nor would we want to discuss the validity of Native American claims to most of the land.

Of course in the eyes of liberal Englishmen the Africans were just wasting their lives isolated from world markets and improving neither themselves not the bank balances of the wealthy while the Native Americans had not claim to the land because they wandered about hunting and fishing in a fanciful states of nature. Except that we know that these supposed states of nature were also mythic and used to justify plunder.

Ultimately. like the rich white people who get his attention, our author would really rather not talk about all that since a wide open continent awaits full of splendid opportunities for rapine, plunder and profit.

One might have forgiven all this if the book had tried to examine the relationships between poorer whites and the rich. How exactly did the dynamic play out between squatters, legal settlers and land speculators. But that book still needs to be written.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Fred D. Seth, Jr.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Terrific overview of early America
Reviewed in the United States on September 7, 2017
Walter McDougall is a giant of the History field. This book and his follow-up "Throes of Democracy" cover American History from the earliest settlers through Reconstruction. The "Freedom" book covers up to the rise of Jackson. McDougal writes about the... See more
Walter McDougall is a giant of the History field. This book and his follow-up "Throes of Democracy" cover American History from the earliest settlers through Reconstruction. The "Freedom" book covers up to the rise of Jackson. McDougal writes about the people who shape each era, smaller interesting contributors and those who made a huge impact but are now largely forgotten. Dr. McDougal''s way with words makes this a page turner. It is a long read, but I was sorry to see it end. Whether you are a casual non-fiction reader or serious historian, reading this book is both an interesting and learning experience. I highly recommend it.
12 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Jeffrey W. Binder
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An American History for a new Millenium
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2016
It''s not often that you get an erudite scholar of history who is also a gifted author (and yes, it IS possible to be one or the other). This book is history at its finest, on both counts. McDougall revisits stories you thought you knew and presents them in ways that will... See more
It''s not often that you get an erudite scholar of history who is also a gifted author (and yes, it IS possible to be one or the other). This book is history at its finest, on both counts. McDougall revisits stories you thought you knew and presents them in ways that will surprise and delight you. It''s not just the secret personal stories behind the events (naughty Caty Greene, why the Virginians were shocked by the over-mountain men (and still are), it''s the fact that he brings a wealth of knowledge to bear on new theories of who we are, what we brought with us, and what we left behind. In one brilliant passage, he describes the 4 Englands that created colonies, and the vital similarities and differences between them: the language quirks that exist today (East Anglian accents in Downeast Maine, for example), their attitudes toward community, education, commerce, and freedom. He shows us how different they were (and yes, there are passages on the Dutch, the Germans, and the African American slaves)...and what, in an astounding turn of events and cultures, brought these disparate groups together to create a nation. As Christopher Hill said, “History has to be rewritten in every generation, because although the past does not change, the present does; each generation asks new questions of the past and finds new areas of sympathy as it re-lives different aspects of the experiences of its predecessors.” Walter McDougall is the latest, brilliant historian for this generation.
11 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What Every American Should Know
Reviewed in the United States on September 7, 2021
This is a brilliant study of the events and circumstances that shaped the foundations of our country.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
L. M Young
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loved It When They Didn''t Talk Politics
Reviewed in the United States on July 18, 2017
This history of the colonial and then pre-James Polk United States is billed as a history of "the brave, brilliant, and flawed people who made America great...native-born and immigrant: German, Latin, African, and British; farmers, engineers, planters and merchants;... See more
This history of the colonial and then pre-James Polk United States is billed as a history of "the brave, brilliant, and flawed people who made America great...native-born and immigrant: German, Latin, African, and British; farmers, engineers, planters and merchants; Protestants, Freemasons, Catholics, and Jews...and the American scofflaws, speculators, rogues, and demagogues." And that''s when it''s at its best, talking about those little people who made up the US: teamsters, the rare woman planters like Caty Greene, pioneers, those who bucked the system and moved west, the Native Americans, etc. But, of course, to do a proper history, one has to get through the political machinations as well, and there you will find this volume harking back to a normal social studies book. So I pretty much read through it in fits and starts, dozing over the politics until they got back to the individual experiences of the individuals. There are some great pieces on Catherine "Caty" Green, the unconventional widow of General Nathaniel Greene, Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, the southern planters vs. the northern farmers, etc. Plus McDougall profiles each of the states that entered the union following the revolution through 1848.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Shopper
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic book. Was very reluctant to read American history ...
Reviewed in the United States on February 19, 2017
Fantastic book. Was very reluctant to read American history until I stumbled on Walter''s cynical approach to history. No destiny and exceptionalism garbage in this book
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Donald B. Owen
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very interesting way to re-package history
Reviewed in the United States on August 24, 2013
The caption above says it all...I love history and this re-packaging, offers a wonderfully different perspective. I did not learn much new "stuff". By way of a simile...it was like ordering my favorite meal in an upscale bistro, rather than visiting the usual... See more
The caption above says it all...I love history and this re-packaging, offers a wonderfully different perspective.
I did not learn much new "stuff". By way of a simile...it was like ordering my favorite meal in an upscale bistro, rather than visiting the usual place I dine. Why?

It''s all in the presentation, which is an intangible that enhances my favorite meal.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Larry
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2016
Everyone American should read this book. It''s how we became who we are.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale

Freedom Just online discount Around the Corner: A New American History: 1585-1828 online sale