From a Certain Point online of View: The Empire Strikes Back outlet online sale (Star Wars) outlet online sale

From a Certain Point online of View: The Empire Strikes Back outlet online sale (Star Wars) outlet online sale

From a Certain Point online of View: The Empire Strikes Back outlet online sale (Star Wars) outlet online sale

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Product Description

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • Celebrate the legacy of The Empire Strikes Back with this exciting reimagining of the timeless film featuring new perspectives from forty acclaimed authors.  

On May 21, 1980, Star Wars became a true saga with the release of  The Empire Strikes Back. In honor of the fortieth anniversary, forty storytellers re-create an iconic scene from  The Empire Strikes Back through the eyes of a supporting character, from heroes and villains, to droids and creatures.  From a Certain Point of View features contributions by bestselling authors and trendsetting artists:

•  Austin Walker explores the unlikely partnership of bounty hunters Dengar and IG-88 as they pursue Han Solo.
•  Hank Green chronicles the life of a naturalist caring for tauntauns on the frozen world of Hoth.
•  Tracy Deonn delves into the dark heart of the Dagobah cave where Luke confronts a terrifying vision.
•  Martha Wells reveals the world of the Ugnaught clans who dwell in the depths of Cloud City.
•  Mark Oshiro recounts the wampa''s tragic tale of loss and survival.
•  Seth Dickinson interrogates the cost of serving a ruthless empire aboard the bridge of a doomed Imperial starship.

Plus more hilarious, heartbreaking, and astonishing tales from:
Tom Angleberger, Sarwat Chadda, S.A. Chakraborty, Mike Chen, Adam Christopher, Katie Cook, Zoraida Córdova, Delilah S. Dawson, Alexander Freed, Jason Fry, Christie Golden, Rob Hart, Lydia Kang, Michael Kogge, R. F. Kuang, C. B. Lee, Mackenzi Lee, John Jackson Miller, Michael Moreci, Daniel José Older, Amy Ratcliffe, Beth Revis, Lilliam Rivera, Cavan Scott, Emily Skrutskie, Karen Strong, Anne Toole, Catherynne M. Valente, Django Wexler, Kiersten White, Gary Whitta, Brittany N. Williams, Charles Yu, Jim Zub
 
All participating authors have generously forgone any compensation for their stories. Instead, their proceeds will be donated to First Book—a leading nonprofit that provides new books, learning materials, and other essentials to educators and organizations serving children in need. To further celebrate the launch of this book and both companies’ longstanding relationships with First Book, Penguin Random House will donate $100,000 to First Book and Disney/Lucasfilm will donate 100,000 children’s books—valued at $1,000,000—to support First Book and their mission of providing equal access to quality education.

Review

“An A+ list of today’s best sf/f writers explore the inner reaches of a galaxy far, far away, which is sure to appeal to sf readers and Star Wars fans alike.” Booklist

About the Author

Hank Green is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of An Absolutely Remarkable Thing and A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor. He’s also the CEO of Complexly, a production company that creates educational content, including Crash Course and SciShow, prompting The Washington Post to name him “one of America’s most popular science teachers.” Complexly’s videos have been viewed more than two billion times on YouTube. Hank and his brother, John, are also raising money to dramatically and systematically improve maternal health care in Sierra Leone, where, if trends continue, one in seventeen women will die in childbirth. 

R. F. Kuang is the Nebula, Locus, and World Fantasy award nominated author of The Poppy War and The Dragon Republic (HarperVoyager). She has an MPhil in Chinese studies from the University of Cambridge and is currently pursuing an MSc in contemporary Chinese studies at Oxford University on a Marshall Scholarship. She also translates Chinese science fiction to English. Her debut The Poppy War was listed by Time and The Guardian as one of the best books of 2018 and has won the Crawford Award and Compton Crook Award for Best First Novel.

Martha Wells has been an SF/F writer since her first fantasy novel was published in 1993, and a Star Wars fan since she saw A New Hope in the theater in 1977. Her work includes The Books of the Raksura series, The Death of the Necromancer, the Ile-Rien trilogy, The Murderbot Diaries series, media tie-ins for Star Wars and Stargate: Atlantis, as well as short fiction, YA novels, and nonfiction. She was also the lead writer for the story team of Magic: The Gathering’s Dominaria expansion in 2018. She has won a Nebula Award, two Hugo Awards, and two Locus Awards, and her work has appeared on the Philip K. Dick Award ballot, the BSFA Award ballot, the USA Today bestseller list, and the New York Times bestseller list.

Kiersten White is the New York Times bestselling, Stoker Award–winning author of many books, including the And I Darken trilogy, the Slayer series, the Camelot Rising trilogy, and The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein. She owns a perfectly reasonable number of lightsabers, and sometimes even lets her kids play with them.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Eyes of the Empire

Kiersten White

“Pick any of the last ten transmissions you’ve looked at. You have to live there for the rest of your life. Where are you?” Lorem said, her voice ringing through the small processing room where they all worked.

Maela admired how Lorem could multitask, sorting through data while keeping up a steady stream of chatter.

Dirjo Harch did not admire it. “Just do your job.” He deleted whatever he was looking at on his screen and pulled up the next data packet. Maela wished they could work individually. Or better yet, in small groups. She’d pick Lorem for her group. And Azier. So really, she’d make a group that was everyone except Dirjo, with his sour expressions and his pinched personality.

“I am doing my job,” Lorem said, chipper as always. Sometimes she wore her cap at a jaunty angle over her dark curls. Just enough to be off dress code, but not enough to give Dirjo an excuse to report her. Maela liked the uniform, liked what it meant. That she was here. That she did it.

A light flashed near Maela’s face and she flipped the switch, accepting an incoming transmission and adding it to the ever-growing queue. She had spent so long with the Vipers, infinite rows of them, round domes and legs like jointed tentacles. She used to stare into their blank black eyes and wonder where they would go. What they would see.

Now she saw everything.

“But while I’m doing my job,” Lorem continued, and Dirjo’s shoulders tensed, “I don’t see why we can’t have some fun. We’re going to be looking through a hundred thousand of these transmissions.”

Azier leaned back, stretching. He rubbed his hands down his pale face, clean-shaven, wrinkled. Maela suspected working on the Swarm transmission recovery and processing unit was a demotion for him, though she didn’t know why. Dirjo and Lorem were just starting their Imperial service, like her.

“Lorem, my young friend,” Azier said in the clipped, polished tones of the Empire, the ones Maela was still trying to master to hide that she came from somewhere else, “the man we report to is serving on the Executor as part of Lord Vader’s Death Squadron. Do you really think fun is a priority for any of them?”

Lorem giggled, and even Maela had to smile. Dirjo, however, scowled, turning his head sharply. “Are you criticizing Lord Vader?”

Azier waved a hand dismissively. “They’re bringing death to those who would threaten the Empire. I lived through a war none of you remember or understand. I have no desire to do it again. And Lorem, to answer your question, I’d rather stay in this floating tin can forever than visit any of the forsaken rocks our probe droids are reporting from.”

“Not a hundred thousand,” Maela said softly.

“What?” Lorem asked, turning around in her chair to give her full attention to Maela.

“Project Swarm sent out a hundred thousand. But some won’t make it to their destinations. Some will crash and be incapable of functioning after. Some might land in environments that make transmission impossible. If I had to guess, I’d say we’ll receive anywhere from sixty-five thousand to eighty thousand transmissions.” Vipers were tough little wonders, and their pods protected them, but still. Space was vast, and there were so many variables.

“In that case,” Lorem said, grinning, “we’ll be done by the end of the day. And then we can decide which planet we’ll live on forever! Though none of my prospects are good. You’re from the Deep Core, aren’t you? Any footage from your planet so we can add it to our potential relocation list?”

Maela turned back to her own work. Her accent attempts hadn’t been as good as she thought, after all. “No footage. We didn’t send droids to Vulpter.”

Azier snorted a laugh.

“Why?” Lorem asked. “Why is that funny?”

Dirjo hit a button harder than necessary. “Half the probe droids we have are made on Vulpter. Back to work.” His tone was brusque, but he looked appraisingly at Maela. “You came from the manufacturing side. I would like to speak about it, sometime.”

Maela went back to her screen. She knew this work wasn’t sought-after. That it was either washouts like Azier or those who hadn’t managed to climb up the ranks yet like Dirjo. But she had specifically requested it and had no desire to move elsewhere in the Empire’s service. She slipped her hand into her pocket and rubbed the smooth, rounded surface of a probe droid’s main eye. How many times had she traced these eyes, longing to see what they saw? Imagined flinging herself through the reaches of space alongside them to uncover sights untold?

And now here she was. As close as she could get. The fates and visions of tens of thousands of probe droids at her fingertips. It was an actual dream come true.

For her, at least.

“No,” her mother said, not bothering to take off her mirrored goggles. “Absolutely not.”

Maela felt the pout taking over her face, which made her angry. She was past pouting age, and definitely past being teased for the way her lips refused to allow her to hide any emotions.

“It’s not fair,” she said, gesturing at the prototype her mother was tinkering with. “There’s so much out there, and they see everything, and all I see is this factory.” Maela leaned close, looking at her distorted reflection in the probe droid’s main eye. She knew it wasn’t an eye, not really, but she always thought of it that way. She would walk down the lines of droids, hanging like fruit from mechanical vines, making certain she saw herself in every single eye. That way, when they went out into the galaxy, flung to places and planets she would never visit, at least part of her would be taken. A ghost in her mother’s machines.

“You think you’ll see so much, working for the Empire?” Her mother made a face like she had a bad taste in her mouth. “You don’t want any part of them.”

“How can you say that?” Maela threw her hands in the air, astounded at her mother’s hypocrisy. “You work for them!”

“I do not work for them. I design and manufacture droids. Which is not an easy business to be in after the Clone Wars.” She sighed, leaning back and running her hands through her wild curls. They were more gray than black now, and Maela knew beneath the goggles she’d see the fine lines of age slowly claiming all the skin around her mother’s eyes. “This is what I’m good at. It’s what keeps our family safe.”

“And keeps us locked up here on this lifeless planet in this lifeless factory!” Maela kicked the table, and the prototype parts went skittering away. “At least if I were working with the Empire, I’d be doing something.”

“Yes,” her mother said, in a tone like a door sliding shut. “You would be doing many things.” She walked away, leaving Maela alone with the metal that was not yet a droid.

Maela picked up the eye and stared at her reflection. She didn’t want to be a ghost, a memory, a prisoner. The eye fit perfectly in her pocket, tucked alongside the decision Maela had made. She would send herself out into the galaxy, flung to new and unknown destinations by the same Empire that claimed these droids.

Maela’s eyes were grainy, so dry she could hear her eyelids click when she blinked. She didn’t know how long she had been watching footage, dismissing transmissions that offered no useful information. The others had wandered out at some point, to eat or sleep, she didn’t know.

She didn’t need her mother’s droids to carry her ghost into the galaxy, because she was connected to them now. They were at her fingertips, and she stared out through them at countless new sights. She was everywhere.

Plants as tall as buildings, towering overhead, glowing in colors human eyes couldn’t have discerned. Desertscapes so barren she could feel her throat parching just looking at them. A depthless ocean, eyes and teeth and fins exploring her as she sank into darkness. World after world after world, and she was seeing them all.

She was so blinded by the infinite white ice of the newest planet that she almost missed it.

“Someone made those,” she whispered, tracing the even, symmetrical mounds rising out of the snow. They were metal, and, according to the droid, they were generating power. Which meant they were being used. But before she could make the connection active and direct the droid, the screen flashed and then the feed was dead.

Her droid had self-destructed. Which could only mean it had been attacked. Maela’s heart began racing. This was it. She had found what they were looking for, she was certain.

She pushed her comm. “Dirjo, I’ve got them.”

His answer crackled with static and sleepiness. “Got what?”

“The Rebellion.”

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
1,745 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Kevin
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bad Stories, Bad writers. Bad.
Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2020
I was hoping for well written short stories in the Star Wars universe, what I got was either boring stories or stories that were too down to earth. Not taking place in a galaxy far, far away. Seems like most of these writers just don''t know how to write in the star wars... See more
I was hoping for well written short stories in the Star Wars universe, what I got was either boring stories or stories that were too down to earth. Not taking place in a galaxy far, far away. Seems like most of these writers just don''t know how to write in the star wars universe, they fall back on what they know instead of actually doing research to understand Star Wars.
23 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Skip it.
Reviewed in the United States on December 21, 2020
I saw this and thought "Oh cool, Star Wars short stories!". There are a couple good stories, most are bantha waste. On balance the book should have been named, "The Empire Strikes Back: Sexually Confused Whiners Whine!" Way to many female stormtroopers, Tie pilots, and... See more
I saw this and thought "Oh cool, Star Wars short stories!". There are a couple good stories, most are bantha waste. On balance the book should have been named, "The Empire Strikes Back: Sexually Confused Whiners Whine!" Way to many female stormtroopers, Tie pilots, and other SJW tropes. Skip this book, unless you like the steaming dump that was the last trilogy.
15 people found this helpful
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Taloncard
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I wish the writers showed familiarity with the source material
Reviewed in the United States on November 22, 2020
These seemed to be some interesting stories, but they didn''t pay attention to anything beyond Empire Strikes back. Characters were killed off that appeared in ROTJ and were in the ROTJ novel. With the format it is very repetitive. Once again lets take a random animal... See more
These seemed to be some interesting stories, but they didn''t pay attention to anything beyond Empire Strikes back. Characters were killed off that appeared in ROTJ and were in the ROTJ novel.
With the format it is very repetitive. Once again lets take a random animal and make it sentient. Some stories are decent, others are abysmal.
14 people found this helpful
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...Paul
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great for Star Wars fans!
Reviewed in the United States on December 6, 2020
If you''re a Star Wars buff, you''ll obviously want to read this book. Not every story is fantastic, but there are some good stories in there, and a few forgettable ones. Some are really well integrated into the "deep lore", which as a Star Wars geek, I adored, and some are... See more
If you''re a Star Wars buff, you''ll obviously want to read this book. Not every story is fantastic, but there are some good stories in there, and a few forgettable ones. Some are really well integrated into the "deep lore", which as a Star Wars geek, I adored, and some are a bit lighter and disconnected.

If you''re not a Star Wars fan, not sure there''s enough "here" to really captivate you, or make you a Star Wars fan.
6 people found this helpful
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Paul Slater
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
the first transport is away
Reviewed in the United States on November 19, 2020
I am enjoying the book I enjoyed the first one in the series and I also hope that they will do one for return of the Jedi. There are stories that are good some are average Some are well , not so good, and some brilliant ones.... See more
I am enjoying the book

I enjoyed the first one in the series and I also hope that they will do one for return of the Jedi.

There are stories that are good
some are average

Some are well , not so good, and some brilliant ones.

Each person will have their own taste, That''s what you get when you get a collection like this.

this is the sort of book, you can read over and over

sit back and enjoy a trip to Hoth System, or to Cloud city , as you read it , you can hear the John williams soundtrack playing, you can hear the sounds of blasters and Tie Fighters flying and the sounds of Wampas.

Its a weird size though in hardcover and looks odd next to its predecessor, and as book lover it bugs me that its smaller than the other star wars hardcovers on the shelf, but that something I can live with.

Worth a read
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J. Marts
4.0 out of 5 stars
Much Better Than the First
Reviewed in the United States on November 14, 2020
- I absolutely love how many of these stories focus on Leia’s work, and how helpful she is. She’s a great leader and person, and this book exemplifies that. - I don’t like how often inappropriate language is used (even ‘ass’ and ‘pissed’--Star Wars should be friendly... See more
- I absolutely love how many of these stories focus on Leia’s work, and how helpful she is. She’s a great leader and person, and this book exemplifies that.
- I don’t like how often inappropriate language is used (even ‘ass’ and ‘pissed’--Star Wars should be friendly for all ages).
- I’m tickled, from “Ion Control” on, how the Rebels find entertainment (and betting) in Han’s approaches to Leia. And later, it humors me as well that so many on Cloud City didn’t realize Vader was a real person.
- It bothers me how too many sentients aren’t named by species for maybe the first quarter. So are they all human? Kind of lame.
- I feel like the phrase “rebellions are built on hope” is insanely overused.

All ratings are out of 5 stars

<i>Eyes of the Empire</i> (4.8): Not all Imperials are stiff and proper--because they are people. Maela comes from a world that makes the Viper droids and now she gets to see through their eyes. I LOVE the end!

<i>Hunger</i> (4): Awww. The Rebels didn’t think about the homes and lives of the Wampas (and later, the tauntauns) when they invade their lands on Hoth.

<i>Ion Control</i> (5): Yay, Toryn Farr! Rieekan also gets in on the betting as mentioned above, hahaha. There is a great mix of humor and then serious, as Imperials find their base on Hoth.

<i>A Good Kiss</i> (3.75): This was 3.5 ‘til the end. The present tense grew on me. I find it interesting that self-help books exist. Chase acts like an annoying teenager, but I also get the feeling he’s supposed to be older. He’s like a whining Han: “It’s not my fault!” There is a good theme that we have to accept our strengths, but it still wasn’t too great.

<i>She Will Keep Them Warm</i> (4): Very neat POV from a tauntaun and how a hard life can actually mean freedom and satisfaction.

<i>Heroes of the Rebellion</i> (4.25): This is a neat story of a reporter (propoganist) named Corwi, who reminds me of Den Dhur in the “Medstar” duology in Legends. Except she’s female. And a human. I think (see note above). At first it seems rushed but then we get into the actual meat of the story, and I like not only learning of her past but also seeing a POV from one of the transports that escapes Hoth. I’d read a more fleshed out story about her!

<i>Rogue Two</i> (4.5): Zev! I feel comforted by this. Other than information on Jyn, I feel like this could have been information in another story and/or comic, whether Legends or Canon. I really like the reason as to why there is no Rogue One designation between Leader and Two.

<i>Kendal</i> (1.5): Boring story about Ozzel.

<i>Against All Odds</i> (2): At first I was excited about Dak. Then I realized it was a weird present tense and a lot of jumping from past to present scenes, from one thing Dak thinks of to another.

<i>Beyond Hope</i> (4): INteresting story about an infantry Rebel who wonders at the hope the Rebellion has, and what comes next.

<i>The Truest Duty</i> (5): The prose is odd and quite formal, which is fitting for Veers. He thinks of himself as Vader’s dagger, which is also perfect Veers. It’s overall chilling and yet inspiring.

<i>A Naturalist on Hoth</i> (4.5): This is slow but beautiful. I love the random information, like on the desert sand slug. Naturalists are essential when trying to find a new place to set base.
And FINALLY a non-human is named as such!

<i>The Dragonsnake Saves R2</i> (3): Cute one-shot comic

<i>For the Last Time</i> (4): One breath can change so much. And Piett has many of them (as compared to Ozzel, at least). We see how he approaches Vader, which is interesting.

<i>Rendezvous Point</i> (5): My biggest issue with this is calling Mon Mothma “Double M.” But…#ThatsSoJansen
Being a starfighter pilot is not like the holodramas, and Wedge is learning this first hand. For example, they have to wear maximum absorbancy undergarments. He doesn’t always make jokes, but when he does, Wes is nearby.
Yes, we get the Wedge-Wes relationship and see how they bounce off each other (perhaps literally) as they heal from losing friends, including Hobbie (HE DOESN’T SURVIVE??!! I don’t believe it. Harumph). I love the two together though. Instead of Yub-nub, we get Hub Grub and I am tickled and have a lot of warm fuzzies. But there are also sobering times and I love what Jason Fry has done here.

<i>The Final Order</i> (2): I am tempted to give it a 2.5 because the end made me cry, but I felt like the writing was too dry for me. It’s how an Imperial sees Vader as the Final Order and then brings to mind a show called “Laser Masters.”

<i>Amara Kel’s Rules for the TIE Pilot Survival (Probably)</i> (3.75): This began as a 4.25 but the language/crassness here...well, it’s the worst culprit. I like her rules and how the story swaps between the rules and real time, with Amara being part of the patrol going into the asteroid field. But then we get things like “pissing,” “getting laid,” and “Palpatine’s withered nuts.” Really?

<i>The First Lesson</i> (4.75): This is a good Yoda POV. Zub catches the nuances of his mind and language well.

<i>Disturbance</i> (4): It’s interesting that during a vision, Palpatine thinks of himself with that name and “the Emperor” in the vision. And through his visions, he learns why Vader is so focused on “the boy.”

<i>This is No Cave</i> (4): Interesting exogorth POV. Through him, we get how vast space is; how old even young exogorths are; and their biology, including how mynocks can live in them. But above all, we see their loneliness.

<i>Lord Vader Will See You Now</i> (4.5): I wish I reread “A New Dawn” like I told myself to do! Sloane! This is a good retroactive insertion of her in the asteroid field, as well as why bounty hunters were hired.

<i>Vergence</i> (3): I like seeing how pure Yoda is, especially compared to the gnarltree.

<i>Tooth and Claw</i> (4.5): This is SO Bossk! I don’t know how much was already canon, but this feels classically Legends. The only thing I REALLY didn’t like is the wooden ship and the massive info-dump.

<i>STET!</i> (4): This is a neat edited article. And, seeing as I hated DJO’s story in the first installation of this anthology, this was a pleasant surprise. The Great Hyperspace War is mentioned, which I thought was [also] Legends but it only a thing from “The High Republic.”

<i>Wait for It</i> (4.5): Fett’s thinking is juvenile at first, though it does improve. I like how much history he and Bossk have, reminding me of the Legends MG series.

<i>Standard Imperial Procedure</i> (4): Even Imperials deal with looped holocasts! I really like the notion of Han having the soul of an engineer. It’s a sobering story though of the constant reminders that breaking protocol in the Empire leads to dire, and sometimes life-threatening, consequences.

<i>There is Always Another</i> (4.75): Capitalizing Issues regarding “Skywalker family Issues” makes me laugh! I bloody LOVE this one! Siri Tachi and Tru Veld are now canon which is bloody fantastic. Lee gets into Obi-Wan’s head extremely well.

<i>Fake it Til You Make it</i> (4): I don’t know if I realized Jaxxon has stories outside of these anthologies. He’s annoying but also full of surprises...as is Cloud City!

<i>But What Does He Eat?</i> (4.5): Lando’s celebrity Devaronian chef has to cook for Vader, even though she doesn’t know what he eats. But she will also do her best to ensure her possible last meal is not mediocre, but the absolute best.

<i>Beyond the Clouds</i> (3.5): I find the work stoppage aspect quite dull, though do like how a 17-year-old bounty hunter turned out the way she does, and even befriends an Ugnaught, who rents her a room. We get a real sense of the scope of Cloud City, which is neat.

<i>No Time for Poetry</i> (2.25): I don’t know how I feel about a humorous Dengar, especially one who calls IG-88 “Iggy.”

<i>Bespin Escape</i> (3.5): This is about how an Ugnaught clan escapes. It is well-written, but it didn’t interest me.

<i>Faith in An Old Friend</i> (3.5): The <i>Falcon</i> is made up of 3 droid brains that call themselves ‘The Collective.’ It bothered me at first until 3PO’s line of not knowing where the mind learned to speak. The story brings us from after the asteroid field to when Lando & Leia pick Luke from the sky. There are some neat moments with other droids and Lando.

<i>Due on Batuu</i> (3): We learn about why Wilrrow was carrying around the ice cream maker.

<i>Into the Clouds</i> (4): A woman named Jailyn learns through her stylist that Leia is on Cloud City. At first I thought this would be about the stylist, but it’s about Jai. She’s barely holding her father’s finances together as the old man takes it all for granted. She meets up with her father’s pilot, Dresh; and there are some neat parallels between her and Leia, and then her & Dresh and Leia & Han.

<i>The Witness</i> (3.8): A female trooper has an issue with FS-451 (I wonder if the name relates to “Fahrenheit 451”). She apparently witnesses the fight between Luke and Vader which is odd. She reflects on her work with the Empire and how it’s affected her.

<i>The Man Who Built Cloud City</i> (3): Some dude thinks he’s king of Cloud City and Lando is his regent.

<i>The Backup Backup Plan</i> (4): Mando''a is spoken! After Lando leaves Cloud City, one of his colleagues, Tal, does what she can to get both the Empire and Mining Guild to leave the citizens and mines of Cloud City alone. There are quite a few surprises along the way--not only for the characters, but for the readers as well (IMO).

<i>Right-Hand Man</i> (5): Oh cool, the 2-1B that attaches a cybernetic hand to Luke has dealt with lightsaber wounds before. Or, if it hasn’t, the medical droids have a collective databank which is really cool. 2-1B is awesome overall, and I like reading about some of the process that occurred.

<i>The Whills Strike Back</i> (4.75): Hilarious commentary on the opening crawl.
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RDDTop Contributor: Batman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Fun Anthology Celebrating Empire''s 40th Anniversary!
Reviewed in the United States on January 9, 2021
Like its predecessor, “Star Wars – From A Certain Point of View,” “Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back – From A Certain Point of View” collects short stories from 40 different authors telling the story of “Episode V” of the Skywalker Saga from the perspective of those... See more
Like its predecessor, “Star Wars – From A Certain Point of View,” “Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back – From A Certain Point of View” collects short stories from 40 different authors telling the story of “Episode V” of the Skywalker Saga from the perspective of those adjacent to the main action. This volume draws upon the talents of Tom Angleberger, Sarwat Chadda, S.A. Chakraborty, Mike Chen, Adam Christopher, Katie Cook, Zoraida Córdova, Delilah S. Dawson, Tracy Deonn, Seth Dickinson, Alexander Freed, Jason Fry, Christie Golden, Hank Green, Rob Hart, Lydia Kang, Michael Kogge, R.F. Kuang, C.B. Lee, Mackenzi Lee, John Jackson Miller, Michael Moreci, Daniel José Older, Mark Oshiro, Amy Ratcliffe, Beth Revis, Lilliam Rivera, Cavan Scott, Emily Skrutskie, Karen Strong, Anne Toole, Catherynne M. Valente, Austin Walker, Martha Wells, Django Wexler, Kiersten White, Gary Whitta, Brittany N. Williams, Charles Yu, and Jim Zub.

While the story follows basic plot of “The Empire Strikes Back,” it uses the adjacent stories to help incorporate elements from subsequent films, television series, and canon novels. For example, Amy Ratcliffe’s story “Heroes of the Rebellion” discusses the importance of Jyn Erso and her band’s sacrifice following the events of “Rogue One,” which Gary Whitta continues in his story “Rogue Two.” Jason Fry’s “Rendezvous Point” references the episode “The Antilles Extraction” of “Star Wars: Rebels,” discussing how Sabine Wren helped Wedge Antilles and Hobbie Klivian defect from Skystrike Academy. Further, the tone of Fry’s story evokes the Rogue Squadron novels from before the Disney acquisition. Both Seth Dickinson’s “The Final Order” and John Jackson Miller’s “Lord Vader Will See You Now” reference or involve Rae Sloane, who first appeared in the novel “A New Dawn” and has gone on to appear in several subsequent novels and comic books. Dickinson similarly explains the Hoth system’s chaotic asteroid field as the result of the planetary system being in an early stage of formation (pg. 194), thereby responding to astrophysicists’ criticisms that the asteroid field is unrealistic. Tracy Deonn’s story “Vergence” gives the cave on Dagobah a backstory while depicting Yoda’s reckoning with his failures, from Dooku leaving the Jedi Order to become a Sith, to the Jedi Order’s role in the Clone Wars, to Ahsoka’s decision to leave the Order after being falsely accused of a crime she did not commit. Michael Kogge, Daniel José Older, Zoraida Córdova, and Austin Walker’s stories focus on the bounty hunters Darth Vader summoned to track the “Millennium Falcon.” In their way, these resemble the 1996 Bantam anthology, “Tales of the Bounty Hunters.” Additionally, Córdova’s “Wait for It” references material from the sixth issue of Marvel’s ongoing “Darth Vader” as well as episodes of “The Clone Wars” including “Death Trap,” “Lethal Trackdown,” “Deception,” and “Bounty.”

Katie Cook’s story, “The Dragonsnake Saves R2,” is the most original in this collection, being a one-page comic strip from the perspective of the creature that tried to eat R2-D2 on Dagobah. Cavan Scott’s “Fake It Till You Make It” features Jaxxon T. Tumperakki, the green space-rabbit who first appeared in issue no. 8 of Marvel Comics’ “Star Wars” title in 1977 and who re-entered the canon with IDW’s “Star Wars Adventures Annual 2018.” While some view Jaxxon as emblematic of the silliness and excess of the old Expanded Universe, I’ve always found him fun and “Fake It Till You Make It” was an enjoyable addition to the canon. Scott’s story is the first prose narrative featuring the character. Alexander Freed’s story, “The Man Who Built Cloud City,” evokes the real-life exploits of Emperor Norton I of San Francisco. Emperor Norton is exactly the kind of person who would fit in well in the “Star Wars” galaxy and Freed’s story works to great effect. “Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back – From A Certain Point of View” follows in the style of its predecessor, offering entertaining alternative perspectives of the major events of “Episode V” along with some nice deep-references for the fans.
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Mac6uffin
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another 40 Years!
Reviewed in the United States on December 8, 2020
Three years ago we got the first "From a Certain Point of View" anthology, focusing primarily on the background characters from the original 1977. Now it is "The Empire Strikes Back" turn! another batch of stories, primarily from those that have worked on Star Wars before.... See more
Three years ago we got the first "From a Certain Point of View" anthology, focusing primarily on the background characters from the original 1977. Now it is "The Empire Strikes Back" turn! another batch of stories, primarily from those that have worked on Star Wars before. Want to know about the Wampa that attacked Luke? The briefly glimpsed Rebel pilots and Imperials? The guy running around Cloud City with an ice cream maker? Then this is for you! Another gift for Star Wars geeks.
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K. G. A. AlaviTop Contributor: Star Wars
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book great cause.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 21, 2020
To think I almost missed this book, I kept seeing a Certain Point of View and thinking it was the Star Wars (The New Hope) version, days before it came out I realised I realised it was the Empire Strikes Back reciving the FACPOF treatment. Like the first book it is...See more
To think I almost missed this book, I kept seeing a Certain Point of View and thinking it was the Star Wars (The New Hope) version, days before it came out I realised I realised it was the Empire Strikes Back reciving the FACPOF treatment. Like the first book it is difficult to give an overall rating as there are some stories I enjoyed more then others. I found I really like probobly 35 out of 40 stories so 5 stars it is. Unlike the first book, the stories are not in completely sequential. Some do overlap so it give a different person''s story or perspective on the same event. I must say prefer this to the first book, and I did like in the first few stories a couple of crossover characters. The book will does follow the format of the group of stories based on the battle of Host will be together. Then the search in the asteroid field and so on. I like that they hive both Rebel and Imperial perspective stories. Also fills in the blanks of what the rest of the Rebels were doing while Luke was Jedi Training giving a major side character a well deserved life. Potentially leading into one of the upcoming Star Wars spinoffs series to be released. Though Disney has let me down with bridging book to TV in the past. Though I still have hope. A very enjoyable book and great stories. The book is 549, 561 if you include the acknowledgments pages. 9once again adds depth and great character to build on in the future I hope. Now I am already looking forward to Return of the Jedi FACPOV.
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Seif Z
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Could have been better
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 17, 2021
Having really enjoyed the first book of this anthology series, I was really looking forward to this one, especially seeing as ''Empire'' is my favourite Star Wars movie. However, I''m left feeling slightly disappointed. I would give this 2 and a half stars but I rounded it up...See more
Having really enjoyed the first book of this anthology series, I was really looking forward to this one, especially seeing as ''Empire'' is my favourite Star Wars movie. However, I''m left feeling slightly disappointed. I would give this 2 and a half stars but I rounded it up to 3. Most of the stories are dull; far too many of them take place in the rebel base on Hoth or on Star Destroyers from the point-of-view of the Empire. They add nothing to the story and none of the incidental characters are interesting enough to have overly long stories based around them. Once we leave Hoth, it gets far more interesting with tales of the space slug and the dark side nexus tree cave on Dagobah being particularly interesting. Other stand out stories are those of Boba Fett and Bossk. Once the story reaches Cloud City, the pacing begins to slow again and we are told several stories from the perspective of random citizens of Bespin, none of whom are particularly interesting. There are a couple of stories that tick the "woke" boxes too which i found pointless. Another disappointing one is Obi-Wan''s story on Dagobah, which doesn''t feel like Alec Guiness'' voice and one of the latter ones features a deserting stormtrooper witnessing the duel between Vader and Luke, which seems incredulous and takes away somewhat the spirit of the scene. The penultimate tale is good, told from the perspective of the medical droid reparing Luke''s hand, but the finale is another 4th wall breaking narrative from "The Whills" which is probably just a non-canon comedy but cones across as stupid, disrespectful and pointless. The only other remark I would make is that this book pointed out something I had never noticed before in the film; there are barely any aliens in it. I''m looking forward to the inevitable Return of the Jedi entry because I know it will be the opposite of this.
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Lewis
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
From a certain point of view....
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 11, 2021
After the fantastic first book celebrating ANH I thought this would be on par, if not better, but in truth I''m finding it difficult. Its not a patch in quality compared to the stories in the first book and without a doubt, if you believe in an agenda by Kathleen...See more
After the fantastic first book celebrating ANH I thought this would be on par, if not better, but in truth I''m finding it difficult. Its not a patch in quality compared to the stories in the first book and without a doubt, if you believe in an agenda by Kathleen Kennedy/Disney or not there is a slightly forced narrative to some of the stories that are to be honest pointless and dull. There must have a lot of potential for some really good stories, but this overall misses the mark. I will finish the book and if there is one for RotJ will complete the collection.
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Mr. R. S. Hutton Mckee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
All depends on your point of view
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 23, 2020
This is a fantastic tale about The Empire Strikes Back or rather it is a tale of takes of characters in the film. A first date book for All Star Wars fans.
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Richard W Gudge
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very good read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 10, 2020
The book gave some background to the Empire Strikes back film and just filled a few gaps all the stories read well and linked read it in 2 sittings and will reread at a slower pace over crimbo
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Alphabet Squadron Bloodline Master & Apprentice The Force Awakens From a Certain Point of View (Star Wars)
Set after Return of the Jedi, Alphabet Squadron follows a team of veteran pilots as they struggle to defeat the Empire once and for all. Before Leia Organa can secure the galaxy’s future, she must confront her past. An unexpected offer threatens the bond between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi as the two Jedi navigate a dangerous new planet and an uncertain future in the first canon Star Wars novel to take place before the events of Star Wars: The Phantom Menace The official novelization of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, the blockbuster film directed by J. J. Abrams. In honor of the fortieth anniversary of Star Wars, each of the forty short stories in this collection reimagine a moment from the original film, but through the eyes of a supporting character.

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