Rusty sale Brown lowest (Pantheon Graphic Library) outlet sale

Rusty sale Brown lowest (Pantheon Graphic Library) outlet sale

Rusty sale Brown lowest (Pantheon Graphic Library) outlet sale

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Product Description

***FINALIST FOR THE 2020 PEN/JEAN STEIN BOOK AWARD***

*** NEW YORK TIMES 100 NOTABLE BOOKS OF THE YEAR ***


A major graphic novel event more than 18 years in progress: part one of the ongoing bifurcated masterwork from the brilliant and beloved author of Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth and Building Stories.


Rusty Brown is a fully interactive, full-color articulation of the time-space interrelationships of three complete consciousnesses in the first half of a single midwestern American day and the tiny piece of human grit about which they involuntarily orbit. A sprawling, special snowflake accumulation of the biggest themes and the smallest moments of life, Rusty Brown literately and literally aims at nothing less than the coalescence of one half of all of existence into a single museum-quality picture story, expertly arranged to present the most convincingly ineffable and empathetic illusion of experience for both life-curious readers and traditional fans of standard reality. From childhood to old age, no frozen plotline is left unthawed in the entangled stories of a child who awakens without superpowers, a teen who matures into a paternal despot, a father who stores his emotional regrets on the surface of Mars and a late-middle-aged woman who seeks the love of only one other person on planet Earth.

Review

***A NEW YORK TIMES 100 NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR ***
***A NPR BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR***
***ONE OF LIT HUB''S MOST HIGHLY ANTICIPATED BOOKS OF 2019***


“Feverishly inventive and intimately told, drawn with empathy, architectural rigor and a spooky sense of a divine eye . . . [Rusty Brown] is the most audacious and inspiring fiction I’ve read this year.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Ware’s trademark excruciating beauty and meticulously crafted, gloriously intricate despair.” Los Angeles Review of Books

“Nobody chronicles lives of quiet desperation with the exacting meticulousness of Chris Ware. His singular style provides him, and us, with direct access to the primal emotions we collectively repress. . . Precision that will take your breath away.”— NPR (Best Books of the Year)

“Nearly two decades in the making, Ware’s latest book,  Rusty Brown . . . is shaping up to be Ware’s epic, a kind of comic-book  Ulysses full of unreliable narrators and occasional forays into stream of consciousness. Take that, Stan Lee.” —Esquire

“Chris Ware’s design sensibility is masterfully claustrophobic . . . the ambition of his storytelling, the scope of his vision, and his absolute control over his medium are astonishing. A generational achievement, presented in a gorgeous edition.” —Forbes

“Remarkable . . . Masterfully illustrated, brilliantly designed, and bursting with compassion . . . This is without a doubt one of the most exciting releases of the year.”— Library Journal (starred Editor’s Pick)

“Showcase[s] Ware’s sublime artistic vision, blending his trademark drawings with a lyrical exploration of weighty themes.” The Washington Post

“Awe-inspiring . . . A treasure trove of insight and invention . . . Ware’s sensibility is gloriously mixed . . . Rusty Brown is a human document of rare richness – infinitely sad, intimately attuned to desolation and disappointment, but never closed to the possibility of a breakthrough . . . Impassioned and ineffable.” The Guardian
 
“Chris Ware’s  Rusty Brown depicts life the way it is: jam packed with details, the closer you look the ever more there is.” — Bookworm

“He is one of the most celebrated living cartoonists . . . His artistry is surgically precise, his lettering a finely-calibrated wonder . . . Ware’s prose is bleak but beautiful, and often grapples with devastatingly relatable themes . . . Exceptional . . . As a whole, Rusty Brown is going to be spectacular, but for now, this first volume is a great and promising start.” Run Spot Run

“Ware’s dazzling geometric art has never been better. Ware again displays his virtuosic ability to locate the extraordinary within the ordinary, elevating normal lives to something profound, unforgettable, and true.” —Publisher’s Weekly (Holiday Gift Guide)

“Another sprawling and adventurous novel that, like all of his work, is lonesome, rueful, uncertain about human connection, yet also empathetic, dazzling—as committed to depicting the overlooked and anonymous as it is innovative.” —Chicago Tribune
 
“Ware is a master of finding the sublime in the mundane . . . a deep exploration of the essence of being human. You’ll admire the extraordinary artwork and attention to such details, but you’ll also be moved to your core by the writing.” —New City

“Ware is well known for his expansive, introspective, depth-plumbing works of graphic fiction, and his latest, featuring a series of interconnected, decade-spanning narratives spiraling outward from an Omaha school, is no different . . . There are only brief moments of warmth and affection, but the wider picture, depicting a complex matrix of aching loneliness; long-simmering, acidic resentment; and a desperation for human connection and fulfillment, is rich with pathos and powerfully stirring.” Booklist (starred)

Rusty Brown is a towering achievement, a hefty, hardback graphic novel that examines, in meticulous and sumptuous detail, the lives of six intertwined characters on a single wintry day in an anonymous Midwestern town . . . There is an underlying melancholy to many of the characters’ lives, but with flickers of hope and redemption threaded through the narrative and the beautiful, precise illustrations . . . A powerful and sometimes heartbreaking book.” AV Club THE BIG ISSUE

“Ware delivers an astounding graphic novel about nothing less than the nature of life and time as it charts the intersecting lives of characters that revolve around an Omaha, Neb., parochial school in the 1970s . . . Ware again displays his virtuosic ability to locate the extraordinary within the ordinary, elevating seemingly normal lives into something profound, unforgettable, and true.” Publishers Weekly (starred)

“Ware fans rejoice . . . Curious and compelling . . . As with Ware''s other works of graphic art, the narrative arc wobbles into backstory and tangent: Each page is a bustle of small and large frames, sometimes telling several stories at once in the way that things buzz around us all the time, demanding notice . . . a beguiling masterwork of visual storytelling from the George Herriman of his time.” Kirkus Reviews (starred)

“There''s little in Chris Ware''s comics that goes unexplored; sadness, disappointment, joy, love, among others are all represented . . . Ware''s talent as a cartoon storyteller is never in question, regardless of subject matter, but Rusty Brown still stands out as among his most affecting stories . . . Yet another unmissable Chris Ware release.” Pop Matters

“Intimate and feverishly inventive, it follows multiple characters to reveal moments large and small . . . Ware’s true gift is not the density of his books but in how he compels us to feel amid such bounty.” —The New York Times Book Review
 
“Emotionally and visually, Ware’s books are often sprawling and messy, but they are never unclear. His panels, small and detailed, are often part of meticulously designed pages, some of which unfold into larger configurations. And yet, there’s a spontaneity to Ware’s work . . . To work through a Chris Ware graphic novel is, in a way, to work through life—its joys, disappointments, exhilarations, and uncertainties.” The Millions

About the Author

CHRIS WARE is widely acknowledged to be the most gifted and beloved cartoonist of his generation by both his mother and fourteen-year-old daughter. His Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth won the Guardian First Book Award and was listed as one of the 100 Best Books of the Decade by The Times (London) in 2009. Building Stories was named a Top Ten Fiction Book of the Year in 2012 by both The New York Times and Time magazine. Ware is an irregular contributor to The New Yorker, and his original drawings have been exhibited at the Whitney Biennial, in the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and in piles behind his worktable in Oak Park, Illinois. In 2016 he was featured in the PBS documentary series Art 21: Art in the 21st Century, and in 2017 an eponymous monograph of his work was published by Rizzoli.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
610 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Jeffb47
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can''t read it
Reviewed in the United States on October 6, 2019
Impossibly small gray font on gray background on many pages makes this book virtually unreadable.
Maybe I''m just not hip enough to appreciate a book that can''t actually be read!
41 people found this helpful
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David SwanTop Contributor: Batman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing Collection
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2019
I own several of Chris Ware’s Acme Novelty Library books, but it felt like I was getting into the middle of a soap opera and his older books had jumped in price so I didn’t stick with it. This is not the first compilation of ANL but it’s the first one I’ve purchased and I’m... See more
I own several of Chris Ware’s Acme Novelty Library books, but it felt like I was getting into the middle of a soap opera and his older books had jumped in price so I didn’t stick with it. This is not the first compilation of ANL but it’s the first one I’ve purchased and I’m really glad I did. Although the book is titled Rusty Brown, his story only occupies something less than a third of the book. The book is basically divided in five sections with Rusty being the first. What’s interesting is that all of the characters have some tangential relationship to each other and sometimes it took me awhile to recognize that the character who is the focus of the current story is one I had already seen.

Before I get into the various section of the book, I want to talk about Chris Ware’s art because I find it fascinating. I took several years of graphic design in college and this is exactly what I would expect artwork to look like if it came from a graphic design major. Everything is precise and meticulous with perfectly straight edges and flawless curves. It’s so interesting how the meticulousness of the art contrasts with the very emotional and bleak stories. Sometimes an artist and writer don’t mesh, and the art feels inappropriate but since Ware is both the writer and artist, this is his intended vision. Ware also uses a lot of colors, but they’re kept muted for the somber tone.

In many ways, the sterility of Ware’s artwork adds to the starkness of the world he has created. A page might have several large frames, or a page could be filled with frames no more than a half inch in size. As someone whose eyes have seen better days, I required a magnifying glass to read a significant amount of the book even while wearing my reading glasses. Ware also includes some gorgeous outdoor images of overcast winter days. I grew up in Northeast Ohio and can definitely identify with these kinds of days and Ware captures them perfectly. These images are created to evoke a mood and work perfectly. The one thing I will say about Chris Ware’s art is it’s unmistakable and I don’t know anyone producing anything like it.

Rusty Brown is a very shy and awkward seven-year-old who carries around a Supergirl doll and I would speculate lies somewhere on the autistic scale. We are also introduced to Chalky White, who seems cut from the same cloth, and his sister, who appears to be less of an autistic but suffers from depression. I believe the entire story takes place in a single day and although we meet many other characters not a single one seems happy. It may all sound unappealing but it’s a pretty compelling story and people who suffer from depression would likely relate.

Next, is a sci-fi story which really didn’t make much sense until the ending which led right into a story about Rusty’s dad when he was a young man. Rusty’s dad is a bit weird and creepy, to say the least, but we already knew that from the Rusty story. He’s a teacher at Rusty’s school and has a propensity to leer at young schoolgirls. The story that follows recounts the entire life of Jordan Lint, birth to death. Jordan was a boy who bullied Rusty Brown and he’s the most unpleasant character in the entire book. We do see how he is a product of his environment, but this is not a story of redemption. None of these stories are cheerful but they are all unforgettable.
The final story is about Joanne Cole, a black schoolteacher at Rusty’s very white school. She is easily the most likable and sympathetic character in the book although she definitely has her own issues including some constant low level racism that she deals with on a daily basis. She has arguably the only upbeat ending in the book so it was a nice way to close things out.

I compared the physical size of Chalky Brown to one of my Acme Novelty Library books and they have the exact same height and width. I also couldn’t detect any difference in page or image quality when comparing the same pages. I will say that there is 10 pages of material in my ANL book that isn’t in Chalky Brown because they are unrelated to the story. If you think you’re getting everything in the ANL books, you aren’t. I’m really glad I picked this book up and I definitely plan on getting at least one more compilation by Chris Ware. These stories may not brighten your day, but they will likely stay with you long after you’re done reading. I definitely plan on reading this book at least once more.
25 people found this helpful
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Richard L. Colman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
brilliant.
Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2019
First, I love Chris Ware adn i love Rusty Brown. However, I have read most of the book before in its serialized form, so I was a little sad about that, as I was hoping for newer material. I appreciate the author''s apology on the back page to loyal fans like myself whoa re... See more
First, I love Chris Ware adn i love Rusty Brown. However, I have read most of the book before in its serialized form, so I was a little sad about that, as I was hoping for newer material. I appreciate the author''s apology on the back page to loyal fans like myself whoa re getting reprinted materials in part.

The book was still absolutely worth it for the final segment and just to have it all in one volume. I love Rusty Brown. I too like the above reviewer wish the adult chalky/rusty hijinks had been included, and what about Putty Gray, I thought maybe id see a little more on their disturbed adulthoods, but I can see how the inclusion of their adulthoods didn''t really fit with the structure of the book and would''ve disturbed the smoothness of the finished project and made it more like a comic book and less like a novel.

perhaps the adult hijinks could''ve been published as a little detachable booklet with it? Man I wouldve loved that maybe a 2nd ed.?

I am not sure I''ve read every rusty brown strip ever published,, and wouldve also appreciated a bibliography of all rusty appearances.

If you haven''t read any of it yet, it''s a tour de force. This is much more powerful than jimmy corrigan and I think even Building Stories. This book and much of chris ware''s work deeply affects me.
11 people found this helpful
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Devron Grant
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Rusty Brown captures the beauty in life''s pain
Reviewed in the United States on October 3, 2019
Chris Ware has done it again. This is an amazing graphical novel. I wish it was offered in digital form because it would make it easier to read repeatedly on my iPad. Without giving anything away, Chris illustrates the stories of, I believe, four main... See more
Chris Ware has done it again. This is an amazing graphical novel. I wish it was offered in digital form because it would make it easier to read repeatedly on my iPad.

Without giving anything away, Chris illustrates the stories of, I believe, four main characters. The characters are all incredibly human and flawed but somehow even for the most flawed of characters, Chris captures the essence of what led to their pain. These aren''t easy stories to read. There is so much pain and despair here and almost all of it unresolved. But I think that''s what I love about his work. It''s genuine and it makes you feel something. It makes you want to go out and live a better life.

I have purchased just about all of the Acme Library books and I love Jimmy Corrigan. I think Jimmy Corrigan is still my favorite book because it feels like a much more complete journey. But books like Rusty Brown are significantly more challenging and they show an evolution in Chris''s work.

My criticisms of the book are minor. As mentioned, I''d love to read this on an iPad. There are several places where the detail in the images is so rich but so small and I''ve used my phone to take a photo and tried to zoom in to make out the very small text in some places. I''m sure this is done for effect. The text is small because it''s background chatter. Or in some cases it''s probably not meant to be read. But nonetheless, I''d like to zoom in.

Also the book is huge and while I''d read anything Chris writes, making it more portable via digital option world be great.

I do have one other criticism content-wise. Chris trusts his readers. There are times when he leaves clues about a major event in a character''s life and doesn''t expressly tell us what happened. But there were places where I would have loved a bit more exposition. There are a few characters where the story ends somewhat abruptly and I was sure that he was going to get back to them, but he never did.

Because the book doesn''t have page numbers and because of the material that the pages are made from, it''s sometimes hard to tell if maybe you skipped a page that was stuck together with another page. I didn''t want to miss anything and occasionally this led to a bit of frustration but a very small annoyance.

The way the book ends gives us the impression that the story isn''t over. But I know how long these books must be to plan and write and illustrate. But they are food for our soul and I can''t wait to read the next one.
10 people found this helpful
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A Reader
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An eye strain and a chore, even for a fan
Reviewed in the United States on November 6, 2019
Intensely difficult to read without a flashlight and a magnifying glass. I''m a massive fan of Ware''s but this is a chore. And although I generally find his sadness very moving, here I just find it one-note and far, far too gloomy. I closed the book before I destroyed my... See more
Intensely difficult to read without a flashlight and a magnifying glass. I''m a massive fan of Ware''s but this is a chore. And although I generally find his sadness very moving, here I just find it one-note and far, far too gloomy. I closed the book before I destroyed my eyesight, but also because I was becoming resentful, and I don''t want to spoil my love of his work.
8 people found this helpful
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queenleo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A stunning achievement.
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2019
At first I was disappointed that much of the book previously appeared in previous Acme Novelty Library editions. So after revisiting a few choice pages I went to the new section (Joanne Cole) -- and was knocked out by just that portion, for me the best of the group (Rusty... See more
At first I was disappointed that much of the book previously appeared in previous Acme Novelty Library editions. So after revisiting a few choice pages I went to the new section (Joanne Cole) -- and was knocked out by just that portion, for me the best of the group (Rusty Brown, Woody Brown, Jason Lint, et al) having an added depth/dimension and like the others is woven in.

Noting the comments on the panels being too small and I can kind of agree (one panel in particular is bothering me still) but this is offset by being able to go back and see all of the stories (the book could have been a smidge bigger but I suspect it would tip over into unwieldy territory). To go along with the other stories perhaps they''ll release the Joanne Cole section in a separate larger format. Again, having them all in one book -- really made this much more enjoyable.

Really - just great.
3 people found this helpful
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Daniel J. Mooney
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great
Reviewed in the United States on December 14, 2020
This is Chris Ware’s book, culled from the pages of Acme Novelty Library. A series which ended ten years ago, and has now been collected into this volume. What is interesting is that the story itself is not over. The very last page ends with “Intermission”. Thus the book is... See more
This is Chris Ware’s book, culled from the pages of Acme Novelty Library. A series which ended ten years ago, and has now been collected into this volume. What is interesting is that the story itself is not over. The very last page ends with “Intermission”. Thus the book is meant to be part one of a however-many series. I have my doubts anymore is forthcoming. Acme Novelty Library came out only once a year -if that. So it took ten years to get this far, and another ten years to collect it. So we will probably have to deal with the material presented here as the final product.

Not that there’s anything wrong with the contents of Rusty Brown. If anything, the material is too good. The art is always crisp, precise, and meticulous. Perfect curves, immaculate edges. Nothing beats it. It sucks you in and forces the reader to admire each page for about half an hour. One minor detail is that the author often plays about with the size of the panels, and so a lot of the words are really tiny. Stick your eyeball a millimeter from the page tiny. That might have a negative impact on your enjoyment.

The story itself rambles. I’m pretty sure the author has an idea of what happens to each of the characters throughout their entire lives, but is scattered about its presentation. In the first few segments all of the character’s lives intersect together at a Catholic school in near-rural Nebraska. After these initial stories introducing the characters, the story focuses on individual characters using that time period of the late 1970s as a pivot.

Unfortunately, the titular character Rusty Brown, fades out of the action after the first story. The action then focuses on his father and his failed writing aspirations, mostly due to fear of rejection. Jordan Lint, a boy we see bullying the titular Rusty Brown and his tumultuous life. Whether he was a good or bad man remains up in the air. I have the feeling a lot was left out of the tale. Finally, we see the life - or part of it, there’s gotta be more - of Rusty’s third grade teacher, Joanna Cole, and her lonely life in snow-bound Nebraska. The stories here are good. Damn good. Mixed with equal parts nostalgia and despair. These aren’t triumphs of the human spirit, but they are undeniably human.
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Elizabeth Metz
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing story; frustrating formatting.
Reviewed in the United States on June 11, 2021
I''m absolutely loving this storytelling. Let me just say that first, because if you''re one of those folks with either fantastic eyes or a whole lot of patience, you can''t go wrong with this story. The artwork is amazing, the stories are top-notch. However --... See more
I''m absolutely loving this storytelling. Let me just say that first, because if you''re one of those folks with either fantastic eyes or a whole lot of patience, you can''t go wrong with this story. The artwork is amazing, the stories are top-notch.

However -- the story is almost inaccessible. I''m not sure who at Pantheon made the decision to print this at microscope-level tininess, but I literally have to read this in very bright light with an actual magnifying glass, or I''d never be able to read it at all. (And my eyes aren''t THAT bad. I wear readers to, y''know, read. But they''re weak, and with them, I can read even fairly small print without issue.). All the great storytelling and beautiful art in the world doesn''t matter if it''s presented in a way that you can''t see it -- and without mechanical means, I think there''s a large segment of the population that will have a lot of trouble accessing it.

But again, the story keeps me diving back in, magnifying glass in hand, to finish it...so it''s apparently not enough of a barrier to keep me out altogether. And the book itself, as an object, is compelling, too. From the fold-open dust jacket poster to the interesting and sometimes non-linear way the story''s presented -- it''s a work of art in itself.

I hope that in subsequent releases, Pantheon will consider accessibility in its design choices.
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Top reviews from other countries

g100
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A stunning example of what the medium of comics can do that no other medium can!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 2, 2019
An absolutely stunning book. This is, in my opinion Ware’s best work. Beautifully drawn, achingly sad and yet at the same time uplifting.
9 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just Incredible!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 22, 2019
The detail in this book is beyond anything else. I haven''t got to the end of it yet as I don''t want to rush it and miss things but it''s already worth my time and money on the pages that I have read.
6 people found this helpful
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A.J.F
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Almost ''building stories'' level greatness!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 9, 2020
This is a thing of beauty- so much better than Jimmy Corrigan (I know people loved that, but this is more coherent and linear somehow despite the multiple POVs and fluctuations in time). I''m a disciple of Chris Wares ''Building Stories'', which I revisit regularly- but I''d...See more
This is a thing of beauty- so much better than Jimmy Corrigan (I know people loved that, but this is more coherent and linear somehow despite the multiple POVs and fluctuations in time). I''m a disciple of Chris Wares ''Building Stories'', which I revisit regularly- but I''d say this is just as good (at a stretch as building stories is the most genius beautiful thing afterall...). This is about the human condition- we follow several interwoven character threads back and forth in time. In usual Chris Ware style there are loads of details to keep going back and checking- beautiful frame by frame breakdowns of everyday minutae. There''s that familiar feel of desolation in this book, like in his other work. We always want the superhero story, the resolution- but Ware puts things how they are, and obviously that can appear bleak at times but this is life, and here life is drawn frame by frame into an intriguing tapestry. Even the jacket of the book you could spend a day studying- this is a piece of art and a joy. If you enjoyed Jimmy Corrigan, or are just a human trying to live as best you know how- then you''ll love this. The price I think is very reasonable for such a big book which must have taken an age to think up and actually draw!
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Derek Shingles
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Add to your Chris Ware collection
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 1, 2020
Add this to your Chris Ware collection. Intriguing, brilliant and confusing in the Ware style. Great stuff!
2 people found this helpful
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Gary T.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Why Rusty Brown?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 20, 2021
I thought this would be better. I don''t know why it''s titled Rusty Brown as he''s hardly in the book. In my opinion it tries to be too clever with a pretentious and confusing format with writing you need a magnifying glass for. Why such small type?!
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