Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale
Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale__right

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Product Description

In her latest cookbook, Deborah Madison, America''s leading authority on vegetarian cooking and author of Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, reveals the surprising relationships between vegetables, edible flowers, and herbs within the same botanical families, and how understanding these connections can help home cooks see everyday vegetables in new light.
 
For over three decades, Deborah Madison has been at the vanguard of the vegetarian cooking movement, authoring classic books on the subject and emboldening millions of readers to cook simple, elegant, plant-based food.

This groundbreaking new cookbook is Madison’s crowning achievement: a celebration of the diversity of the plant kingdom, and an exploration of the fascinating relationships between vegetables, edible flowers, herbs, and familiar wild plants within the same botanical families.

Destined to become the new standard reference for cooking vegetables, Vegetable Literacy shows cooks that, because of their shared characteristics, vegetables within the same family can be used interchangeably in cooking. It presents an entirely new way of looking at vegetables, drawing on Madison’s deep knowledge of cooking, gardening, and botany. For example, knowing that dill, chervil, cumin, parsley, coriander, anise, lovage, and caraway come from the umbellifer family makes it clear why they’re such good matches for carrots, also a member of that family. With more than 300 classic and exquisitely simple recipes, Madison brings this wealth of information together in dishes that highlight a world of complementary flavors. Griddled Artichokes with Tarragon Mayonnaise, Tomato Soup and Cilantro with Black Quinoa, Tuscan Kale Salad with Slivered Brussels Sprouts and Sesame Dressing, Kohlrabi Slaw with Frizzy Mustard Greens, and Fresh Peas with Sage on Baked Ricotta showcase combinations that are simultaneously familiar and revelatory.

Inspiring improvisation in the kitchen and curiosity in the garden, Vegetable Literacy—an unparalleled look at culinary vegetables and plants—will forever change the way we eat and cook.

Amazon.com Review

Featured Recipe from Vegetable Literacy: Ivory Carrot Soup with a Fine Dice of Orange Carrots

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 pound white carrots, scrubbed and thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon raw white rice
  • Sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 thyme sprig
  • 4 cups water or light chicken stock
  • Few tablespoons finely diced orange carrots and/or other colored carrots
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • About 1 tablespoon minced fine green carrot tops
Directions

Warm the butter and oil in a soup pot and add the onion, white carrots, rice, 1 teaspoon salt, and the sugar and thyme. Cook over medium heat for several minutes, turning everything occasionally. Add 1 cup of the water, cover, turn down the heat, and cook while you heat the remaining 3 cups water. When the water is hot, add it to the pot, cover, and simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes.

While the soup is cooking, cook the diced carrots in salted boiling water for about 3 minutes and then drain.

When ready, let cool slightly, then remove and discard the thyme sprig. Puree the soup until smooth in a blender. Taste for salt and season with the pepper. Reheat if it has cooled.

Ladle the soup into bowls, scatter the diced carrots and carrot tops over each serving, and serve.

Featured Recipe from Vegetable Literacy: Peas with Baked Ricotta and Bread Crumbs

Serves 2

Ingredients
  • Olive oil
  • 1 cup high-quality ricotta cheese, such as hand-dipped full-fat ricotta
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons fresh bread crumbs
  • 4 teaspoons butter
  • 2 large shallots or 1/2 small onion, finely diced (about 1/3 cup)
  • 5 small sage leaves, minced (about 1 1/2 teaspoons)
  • 1 1/2 pounds pod peas, shucked (about 1 cup)
  • Grated zest of 1 lemon
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Chunk of Parmesan cheese, for grating
Directions

Heat the oven to 375°F. Lightly oil a small baking dish; a round Spanish earthenware dish about 6 inches across is perfect for this amount.

If your ricotta is wet and milky, drain it first by putting it in a colander and pressing out the excess liquid. Pack the ricotta into the dish, drizzle a little olive oil over the surface, and bake 20 minutes or until the cheese has begun to set and brown on top. Cover the surface with the bread crumbs and continue to bake until the bread crumbs are browned and crisp, another 10 minutes. (The amount of time it takes for ricotta cheese to bake until set can vary tremendously, so it may well take longer than the times given here, especially if it wasn’t drained.)

When the cheese is finished baking, heat the butter in a small skillet over medium heat. When the butter foams, add the shallots and sage and cook until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the peas, 1/2 cup water, and the lemon zest. Simmer until the peas are bright green and tender; the time will vary, but it should be 3 to 5 minutes. Whatever you do, don’t let them turn gray. Season with salt and a little freshly ground pepper, not too much.

Divide the ricotta between 2 plates. Spoon the peas over the cheese. Grate some Parmesan over all and enjoy while warm.

With Pasta: Cook 1 cup or so pasta shells in boiling, salted water. Drain and toss them with the peas, cooked as above, and then with the ricotta. The peas nestle in the pasta, like little green pearls.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Committed vegetarians will cheer over another book from the hands of Madison. One of the nation’s best-known vegetarian cooks, Madison has practiced her craft both at Alice Waters’ Chez Panisse and her own restaurant. Comprehensive and exhaustive, this new cookbook surveys the world of edible plant products in rigorous scientific groupings. Both text and color photographs educate readers to discover correlations and kinships and to explore how recipes adapt to encompass related ingredients. All of the nightshade family—eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes, and peppers—appear together. A sandwich of spinach, caramelized onions, and roasted peppers neighbors a sort of casserole assembled from little-known quelites (lamb’s quarters) and mushrooms layered with corn tortillas. Madison introduces even more curious vegetables, such as fourwing saltbush. Although most recipes fall into the vegan category, there are plenty of dairy products and eggs to broaden recipes’ appeal. Madison herself confesses partiality to tomatoes baked in cream. A necessary addition for both reference and circulating collections. --Mark Knoblauch

Review

“I have always marveled at Deborah Madison’s deep knowledge of vegetables and her original creations, which taste just as delicious as they sound. Vegetable Literacy is her latest tour de force, a massive well of knowledge that makes you want to read and learn as well as cook. A fine achievement and a real inspiration for me.”
—Yotam Ottolenghi, author of Plenty and Jerusalem
 
“I have long been a fan of both Deborah’s vibrant food and her many thorough, thoughtful cookbooks. In Vegetable Literacy she offers, with abundant warmth and generosity, observations from years of garden-to-table cooking. Filled with fascinating botanical notes and inspired recipes that really explore vegetables from the ground up—it is a pleasure to read. The writing is beautiful and the lessons are astutely down to earth.”
—David Tanis, author of Heart of the Artichoke and Other Kitchen Journeys
 
“Deborah Madison has taken vegetables to a whole new level. You’ll want to know what she knows—about botany, family pairings, and companion flavors on the plate. In cooking, Madison excels, but she’s also a natural with observation in the garden. Her passion is palpable, her scholarship tops, and her prose exquisite.”
—Amy P. Goldman, PhD, author of The Heirloom Tomato: From Garden to Table
 
“The are few people equipped with the curiosity, skill, and eye for observation required to construct a volume of this size and scope—and Deborah does it masterfully. Vegetable Literacy will shift the way both home and professional cooks think about the relationship between ingredients, and vegetables in particular. Using this book has felt like a missing puzzle piece snapping into place—inspiring, intimate, informative, and beautifully illustrated.”
—Heidi Swanson, author of Super Natural Every Day
 
“For those of us who love vegetables, Deborah Madison gives not only practical tips for buying them, but also a bounty of diverse recipes. This is a monumental cookbook from a gifted writer and one of the best cooks of our time.”
—David Lebovitz, author of Ready for Dessert and The Sweet Life in Paris
 
“In Vegetable Literacy, Deborah Madison elegantly folds together a joy of gardening, a fascination for botanical kinship, and an expansive knowledge of fine and simple cooking. This book is a nutrient-dense treasure.”
—Wendy Johnson, author of Gardening at Dragon’s Gate: a Work in the Wild and Cultivated World
 
“In her most exciting and innovative book to date, Deborah Madison shows us how the botany in our gardens can inform and guide our preparation and cooking of meals that will both delight and nourish us all. Come directly from the garden to the kitchen with Deborah, and you will never observe or use vegetables in an uninspired way again. This book feeds our imaginations and souls with more insights per page than any cookbook I know.”
—Gary Paul Nabhan, ethnobotanist and author of Coming Home to Eat and Desert Terroir

About the Author

DEBORAH MADISON is the author of eleven cookbooks and is well known for her simple, seasonal, vegetable-based cooking. She got her start in the San Francisco Bay Area at Chez Panisse before opening Greens, and has lived in New Mexico for the last twenty years. In addition to writing and teaching, she has served on the boards of Slow Food International Biodiversiy Committee, the Seed Savers Exchange, and the Southwest Grassfed Livestock Alliance, among others. She is actively involved in issues of biodiversity, gardening, and sustainable agriculture.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction
 
It started with a carrot that had gone on in its second year to make a beautiful lacy umbel of a flower. I was enchanted and began to notice other lacy flowers in my garden that looked similar—parsley, fennel, cilantro, anise, as well as Queen Anne’s lace on a roadside—they are all members of the same plant family, as it turned out. Similarly, small daisy-like flowers, whether blue, yellow, orange, enormous or very small, bloomed on lettuce that had gone to seed as well as on wild chicories, the Jerusalem artichokes, and, of course, the sunflowers themselves. Were they related? They were, it turns out. And did edible members of this group somehow share culinary characteristics as well? Often they did. That led me to ask, What are the plant families that provide us with the vegetables we eat often, what characteristics do their members share, and what are their stories?
 
 
Cauliflower with Saffron, Pepper Flakes, Plenty of Parsley, and Pasta
For 4
I love this approach to cauliflower. In fact, I’d say it’s my favorite way to cook it. It’s golden, aromatic, and lively in the mouth. It’s good alone and very good spooned over pasta shells, which catch the smaller bits of the vegetable. Even a small cauliflower can be surprisingly dense, weighing a pound and yielding 4 cups florets.
 
1 cauliflower (about 11/2 pounds), broken into small florets, the core diced
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for tossing the pasta
1 onion, finely diced
2 pinches of saffron threads
1 large clove garlic, minced
Scant 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
4 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
Sea salt
8 ounces pasta shells, snails or other shapes
Grated aged cheese or crumbled feta cheese (optional)
Steam the cauliflower florets and core over boiling water for about 3 minutes. Taste a piece. It should be on the verge of tenderness and not quite fully cooked. Set it aside.
Bring a large pot of water to a boil for the pasta.
Heat the oil in a wide skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and saffron and cook, stirring frequently, until the onion is soft, 6 minutes or so. The steam will activate the saffron so that it stains and flavors the onion. Add the garlic, pepper flakes, and a few pinches of the parsley, give them a stir, and then add the cauliflower. Toss the cauliflower to coat it with the seasonings, add 1/2 cup water, and cook over medium heat until the cauliflower is tender, just a few minutes. Season with salt, toss with half of the remaining parsley, and keep warm.
While the cauliflower is cooking, cook the pasta in the boiling water seasoned with salt until al dente. Drain, transfer to a warmed bowl, and toss with a few tablespoons of oil and the remaining parsley. Taste for salt, then spoon the cauliflower over the pasta, wiggle some of it into the pasta crevices, grate the cheese on top, and serve.
With Shrimp: When wild Gulf shrimp are in season, take advantage of their sweet goodness. Peel 1 pound shrimp, then sauté them over high heat in olive oil until pink and firm, after 5 minutes or so. Toss them with chopped garlic and parsley and divide them among the individual pasta plates or heap them over the top of the communal dish. Omit the cheese.

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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
335 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

booger
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is gorgeous
Reviewed in the United States on November 6, 2018
Not only is this book just beautiful to look at. It''s so informative. The concept is brilliant. I''ve already spent hours skimming through the plant descriptions and recipes. Even though this book is a welcome new addition to my cookbook collection; unfortunately, I dont... See more
Not only is this book just beautiful to look at. It''s so informative. The concept is brilliant. I''ve already spent hours skimming through the plant descriptions and recipes. Even though this book is a welcome new addition to my cookbook collection; unfortunately, I dont think that I''ll be making too many of the recipes. Nearly every single recipes contains dairy or grains. While the grains and cream, butter are a simple switch. Most recipes star some delicious cheese (I know, that sounds terrible right? lol). Had I bought this cookbook last year I would love recipes featuring cheeses. But as it is I can''t eat cheese like that anymore and the recipes would suffer from removing them.
If you love your veggie dishes featuring cheese as a main component, you''ll love this one. If you can''t have cheese for health reasons, you''ll need to be creative to replace the cheese in most of the recipes in this book. I would still recommend it for the plant information alone. The recipes are an added bonus.
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VerreTop Contributor: Pets
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is wonderful. I like that it gives the Latin names ...
Reviewed in the United States on April 23, 2017
This book is wonderful. I like that it gives the Latin names of all the vegetables and a bit of useful information about each of the vegetable families. It covers a lot of obscure vegetables that you find at a farmer''s market or ethnic grocery store and find yourself... See more
This book is wonderful. I like that it gives the Latin names of all the vegetables and a bit of useful information about each of the vegetable families. It covers a lot of obscure vegetables that you find at a farmer''s market or ethnic grocery store and find yourself wondering what they are and what to do with them. I liked this book so much I gave my first copy away as a Christmas present, and then decided I would try out the Kindle version as a replacement. I think I preferred the hard copy, because this is the sort of book that you''re going to want to flip around in, and I find it annoying to try to "flip around" in ebooks. Kindle seems more convenient for the kinds of books that you read straight through. I suppose it is convenient that I can pull up a recipe on my iPad and consult it in the kitchen without having to worry about getting the book dirty. But so far I''ve used this book more for reading about the vegetables themselves than as a cooking manual, so in the long run I kind of wish I had purchased another hard copy.
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not your average cook book
Reviewed in the United States on January 26, 2018
When you are looking for quick inspiration for tonight''s supper you can leave this on the shelf, but if you are looking to immerse yourself in a culinary heaven then this is definitely the book to turn to. Well written, beautifully presented and with something to catch... See more
When you are looking for quick inspiration for tonight''s supper you can leave this on the shelf, but if you are looking to immerse yourself in a culinary heaven then this is definitely the book to turn to.
Well written, beautifully presented and with something to catch your attention on every page, humble vegetables are transformed into tantalising gems of information and inspiration.
A wide variety of recipes, some old favorites given a new twist, some new and surprising uses of herbs and vegetables, provide an endless source of inspiration. This is definitely a book that I will turn to repeatedly.
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jgintx
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Yes, you should buy another Deborah Madison cookbook
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2013
My jam-packed cookbook shelves already held four Deborah Madison cookbooks, and I figured that was enough. But the lure of the vegetable info hooked the gardener in me. I started reading Vegetable Literacy as a book, but quickly took it from coffee table to kitchen, and... See more
My jam-packed cookbook shelves already held four Deborah Madison cookbooks, and I figured that was enough. But the lure of the vegetable info hooked the gardener in me. I started reading Vegetable Literacy as a book, but quickly took it from coffee table to kitchen, and have been cooking from it all summer and into the fall. We tend to eat vegetarian with fish, seafood, or meat a few times per week, and the recipes complement that style of eating very well.

The recipes are relatively simple, clearly written, and very tasty. I''ve tried new ingredients--tempeh, coconut butter, and black quinoa come to mind. I''ve learned new techniques--for example, presoaking lentils and adding salt to beans at the start of cooking, which has done wonders for my black beans.

Some of my new go-to recipes from this book are the basic lentil recipe, Rio Zape Beans with salt-roasted tomatoes (can sub black beans), pan-fried tempeh with trimmings, which I serve with salsa and lettuce leaf wrappers, roasted asparagus with chopped egg, griddled eggplant rounds, and heirloom tomato quinoa soup. I''ve tried many others and enjoyed all.

I noticed another review that complained about lack of depth in the information on vegetables. I''d say this is a cookbook that gives extra insight into ingredients and a few tips on vegetable gardening. For a book that focusses on in-depth nutritional information on vegetables, I like "Eating on the Wild Side".
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I Do The Speed LimitTop Contributor: Cooking
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A siren song for vegetable gardeners, would-be gardeners and lovers of vegetables
Reviewed in the United States on March 15, 2013
If you have created a vegetable garden, and worked it even just one year or worked it more years than you care to count, you will be hooked on this book by the second page of the introduction. It contains a wealth of information; so much information, that you should not... See more
If you have created a vegetable garden, and worked it even just one year or worked it more years than you care to count, you will be hooked on this book by the second page of the introduction. It contains a wealth of information; so much information, that you should not wait for your local library to get a copy: You need it NOW, and you will refer to it way too often to have to rely on the library''s copy. If you are considering putting in your first vegetable garden, or if you often buy from a farmers'' market or a local produce stand, you need to order this book, too. You will love it and, not only will you cook its recipes; you will be able to create your own favorites from all the tips included.

If you buy your produce from the grocery store, you will find a lot of great recipes and a lot of information on unfamiliar edible plants, grains, grasses, herbs, beans and vegetables. But (I''d roughly estimate that) a fifth of the information provided will not be of value to the grocery-store-buyer, since the book provides information on varieties available and how to make use of all parts of the plant: From seedlings that you weed out, to leaf tops of edible roots, to roots of edible tops, to bolted stems and flowers, etc. In other words, parts of the plant that grocery-store-buyers don''t often see. But, I''d bet good money that anyone who reads this book and doesn''t have a garden, will be hurriedly searching for a sunny piece of earth in which to pitch a shovel!

I won''t go into the great information that you can find by reading this product page on Amazon. Definitely take advantage of the "Look Inside" feature. And definitely take a look at Deborah Madison''s other published books. I find it a waste of space to list chapters and covered topics and ingredients in a review when it''s all there in the "Look Inside".

Deborah Madison has been writing quality cook books for ages. It was her book Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone that helped me convince the men in my family that they were not going to die if there wasn''t meat on the dinner plate (that was back in the 1990s). But the point I''m trying to make is this: Madison has vast experience with veggies, grains, grasses, herbs, and beans. She has the necessary expertise, writing style and refined taste buds to put together a valuable and worthwhile cook book.

What may not be obvious by browsing through the Contents and Index pages:

--Besides the main star ingredient, other ingredients that flavor the recipes are not hard to locate. They are not necessarily limited to everyday ingredients with which we are all familiar: For instance, if you don''t already know ghee and miso paste, you will be introduced to it in some of these recipes.

--For most of the plants, you will find what I call a "food thesaurus" listing or section; "good companions" is what Madison calls them. You will have to remember those "companions" yourself, because they are not listed in the index.

--You won''t find recipes where the featured vegetable is NOT the primary flavor. In other words, you won''t find chicken, salmon, sausage recipes with accompanying veggies and herbs or sauces made of the highlighted veggie or herb. You might find fish and meats mentioned in the "Good Companions" listed, but, again, you won''t find them listed in the index.

--This is not a vegan book: There are eggs, butter, cream and such. Actually, there are some very nice egg recipes. We''ve tried the egg salad with tarragon (I used Mexican tarragon, because that''s what grows in my Southern garden and eggs from our own hens.)

--This is NOT a how-to-garden book. Although it does list some seed recommendations.

--This is NOT a book that is slanted towards where Madison lives and gardens in New Mexico. Meaning, you will not find information that is inappropriate for your area. (I think that is a great accomplishment on Madison''s part: That she was able to make the book very personable, but still refrain from giving us information--stated as fact--that is unsuitable or different for the various parts of the U.S. (For instance, I must plant my summer squash and tomatoes in early March. My zukes are finished in June and my tomatoes are over in July. Your tomatoes may last until the first frost.) It is a pet peeve of mine that so many vegetable gardening cookbooks assume I have tomatoes in August...

--Cooking techniques are explained. And many, many techniques are employed: Steaming, sauteing, roasting, baking, grilling, braising and pressure cooking. If there are recipes for breaded and fried veggies, I don''t remember seeing them. (Thank you for that!!!)

--There are so many fantastic and helpful tips: How about this one? The extra-long stem on an artichoke is meant to be used: Peel, slice, drop in acidulated water, then braise, saute, or toss them into a soup.

-- The simplicity of the recipes that forces the focus onto a specific vegetable, sort of reminds me of Tender: A Cook and His Vegetable Patch by Nigel Slater. But I like this book a whole lot better because it is definitely slanted towards American ways, names, places, available ingredients, available seeds and measurements***. (Slater''s book, while it is filled with wonderful recipes and ideas, is slanted towards a British audience.)

--***There is an adequate conversion chart of measurements at the very end of the book. Being on the last page, it is very easy to flip to. (It''s a bit hard to read: Green ink and not a large type point size.)

--Unlike the two books by Lawson, this book does NOT have many photographs, as it is meant to be a wealth of information, not just pretty pictures to look at. (I think it could have used some more pictures, though. But then the book would have weighed a ton.) It is definitely not a coffee table book.

--There are many soup recipes--and that is important in our family. There are all kinds of salads, side dishes, and main dishes. Best of all: I''m very happy to see there are hardly any pasta recipes. They seem to be a dime a dozen these days...

--We''ve become fans of quite a lot of Asian greens lately--they do so well in our gardens; and of course some are mentioned in this book--bok choy and Chinese broccoli and perilla (shiso) to mention a few, but I will still be referring to my favorite Asian cook books (and the Kitazawa Seed catalog) for most of them.

I''ve only had this book a short few days, but we''ve already sampled several recipes. We cook from our garden, so I was kind of limited in the recipes I could choose from--it being mid-March in the Coastal Plains of Texas. But follows is a list of what I created so far, and the recipes have worked and so have the flavor combinations: Grilled Onions with Cinnamon Butter (using the first of the 1015 Texas Onions from down in the Valley); Braised Parsley Root (with the last from the garden--had to get them out to make room for two very special cherry tomatoes, both originating from further down south); Chard Soup with Cumin, Cilantro and Lime; and to use up two lonely rutabagas, I combined ideas from the Winter Stew of Braised Rutabagas Carrots, Potatoes and Parsley, and Rutabaga Soup with Gorgonzola Toasts.

I''m really looking forward to trying almost all the recipes in this book. And, much to my delight, we''ve got quite a few of those mentioned in this book already planted in our garden.
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Alice
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not as good as I expected
Reviewed in the United States on March 18, 2019
This book has a few good recipes, but they’re definitely not healthy. Most are carb and fat heavy; using cream, huge amounts of grains, or lots of salt. The information that is based on scientific fact is very limited, while most of the book is narrative opinion of the... See more
This book has a few good recipes, but they’re definitely not healthy. Most are carb and fat heavy; using cream, huge amounts of grains, or lots of salt. The information that is based on scientific fact is very limited, while most of the book is narrative opinion of the author about how things taste to her. Also, she does not classify the plants based on current botanical standards, and states that she prefers to make her own categories. Not a fantastic purchase but not a big enough disappointment to return it.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A beautiful and interesting book!
Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 2017
We have a sizable urban garden and I was looking for a book to help us maximize our use of the crops we harvest. This is that book. It gives not only a nice selection of uncomplicated, but creative, recipes, but also basic information on each vegetable. There''s also a... See more
We have a sizable urban garden and I was looking for a book to help us maximize our use of the crops we harvest. This is that book. It gives not only a nice selection of uncomplicated, but creative, recipes, but also basic information on each vegetable. There''s also a section for each called, "Using the Whole Plant" that tells you about parts of the plant that you might not realize are edible (and might even be quite tasty!). The hardcover version of the book is about an inch thick - it''s on the larger side, and for that reason, it could make a nice coffee table book. I love that most of the recipes have shorter ingredient lists. It''s nice to have simple recipes that are quick but have interesting flair and unconventional ingredients. This book is going to get a lot of use in our home!
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Much more than a vegetable cookbook!
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2013
Despite having many cookbooks, vegetable cooking has always been a challenge for me because I lacked fundamental knowledge about them. Not understanding them made it difficult to pivot on-the-fly and cook creatively with them. Vegetable Literacy is a beautiful... See more
Despite having many cookbooks, vegetable cooking has always been a challenge for me because I lacked fundamental knowledge about them. Not understanding them made it difficult to pivot on-the-fly and cook creatively with them.

Vegetable Literacy is a beautiful book which is organized into 12 chapters representing different plant families. This is a logical way to learn about vegetables since those in the same plant family share characteristics... and knowing these gives you the information you need to cook creatively with vegetables (vs. cooking casseroles, or boiling/steaming). Each chapter contains information like: a botany lesson, related vegetables and how to use them, history, nutritional properties, storage information, use of various plant parts, and "good companions" (i.e.: complementary ingredients which work well with each respective vegetable), and... recipes.

Principles in the book were evident in the first recipe I tried: "Broccoli and Green Zebra Tomato Salad". Not a combination I would have ever thought of before.. but to quote Deborah Madison... "the acidity of the tomatoes brighten up the bland broccoli.. and the balance is perfect". The recipe was wonderful!
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Top reviews from other countries

Mr B
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Vegetable literacy. D Madison
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 16, 2014
Forget the Nigella Goddess, but maybe not Claudia Roden, or Elizabeth David - women cooks can be so unpretentious. I remember showing my edition of the Greens Cookbook to my sister. She said, oh no, not another. We have a lot of sorell in the garden, what can I do with it....See more
Forget the Nigella Goddess, but maybe not Claudia Roden, or Elizabeth David - women cooks can be so unpretentious. I remember showing my edition of the Greens Cookbook to my sister. She said, oh no, not another. We have a lot of sorell in the garden, what can I do with it. Looked it up in the index as one does. I am going to get this, she says. This book is brilliant. Apparently, Ottelonghi likes what she does, and is impressed with what she knows - she is remarkably free of spin. I trust what she says, experience has proved her spot on. A lovely book. Meat eaters, please purchase.
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S. Arturi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
... many of her books and this one is very good too. Madison gives u delicious
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 14, 2015
I have very many of her books and this one is very good too. Madison gives u delicious, well explained, unfussy food. The botanical info is really good too. This is a different vegetation food cookery book and I would recommend it to any cook, from the novice to the...See more
I have very many of her books and this one is very good too. Madison gives u delicious, well explained, unfussy food. The botanical info is really good too. This is a different vegetation food cookery book and I would recommend it to any cook, from the novice to the seasoned one.
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dnmartin87
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
a great addition to your book shelf
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 6, 2014
as someone who grew up on vegetables boiled until the point of mercy I have a slight aversion to anything which grows out of the ground. I bought this book to help make vegetables interesting and enticing and I have to say I was very impressed. An encyclopedia of vegetables...See more
as someone who grew up on vegetables boiled until the point of mercy I have a slight aversion to anything which grows out of the ground. I bought this book to help make vegetables interesting and enticing and I have to say I was very impressed. An encyclopedia of vegetables is perhaps how to best describe it. a great addition to anyone''s book shelf.
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Author
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Deborah Madison writes beautifully. I borrowed this book of a friend and ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 11, 2016
Deborah Madison writes beautifully. I borrowed this book of a friend and have since invested myself, plus bought all of her back catalogue. She''s highly knowledgable and I use all of her books for reliable reference.
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Mrs C Kane
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 4, 2015
great present for new veggie
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Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening wholesale with Twelve Families from the Edible Plant Kingdom, with over 300 Deliciously Simple outlet online sale Recipes [A Cookbook] sale